Corona Calories.

It’s fair to same some avid gym goers are in a bit of a panic.
 
A few questions regarding how much people should be eating int his time has been popping up.
 
In all honesty most would do well to take the calories down a notch, simply due to the fact they eat too many as it is, yet in some cases the extra calories may be beneficial because of extra recovery.
 
What to do, right?
First it would be to try and consume as many of your calories from nutrient dense food sources (meat/veg), then you can worry about the rest.
 
Without all the fancy calories equations using activity multipliers this will serve you well.
 
Take your total bodyweight in lbs:
 
Multiply it by 13, those will be your corona calories (for most people).
 
Me bing a slight 74kg (163lbs), it gives me this:
 
163 x 13 = 2119 calories per day.
 
This would be based on reduced activity (a lot of walking and grappling for me).
 
Believe it or not that is about right to sustain my current weight with minimal activity that would allow maximal LBM preservation.
 
A normal day will see me right with 2800-3200 to sustain my weight, I know this because of adding them up on random days across serval months to see trends (on myself personally).
 
While the method I offer isn’t as complex as many, it works.
 
The above will serve you well in this time.
 
Here are the other numbers I use when life is back to normality and training/activity is back up.
 
To lose mass: BW x11-13
(starting at 13, dropping slowly to 11)
 
To gain mass: BW x17-19
(starting at 17, building slowly to 19)
 
^^ You start at the lower number and see if your mass/LBM is going the way you want it to, then stay with those callers until progress stops and adjust up or down accordingly.
 
One main issue people come across is the go to the extreme end far too soon and then have nowhere left to go, a common mistake that people repeatedly make time and again.
 
Don’t be one of them.
 
As for macros, if that’s your things, here is my suggestion:
 
Protein – 1g per pound of total BW
Fat – 35% total daily calories
Carbs – whatever calories are left after Pro/Fat tallied up
 
Simple.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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How many training options are there?

Fellow coaches & trainers, one for you.
 
How many training options are there?
 
A million or perhaps more, in all truth I have no idea.
 
You may laugh at that yet if you replace the term ‘training options’ with the word ‘workout’ you’ll soon start to see how much choice there is.
 
Even in knowing this though there are some key things to remember.
 
1 – All the people at the top (insert field) do similar things.
2 – Training is largely the same with small variations.
3 – You can’t master everything.
 
In our modern world because we have so much choice we get confused, our brain shuts down and leaves us very susceptible to influence.
 
If memory serves it’s about 9-11 things at once and we will shut down (I may be wrong on this).
 
So in knowing this what is the best route to take?
 
In my view it is this – it’s the one that doesn’t overwhelm you.
 
Most people just want to train for fun, to get a few results, have some social time/reprieve from life and feel a little better about themselves, that’s about it.
 
As such there is no need to be married to a method or compare all the different routes, you can feel free to bounce from on to another because goes what, there’s not ‘training police’.
 
No one cares what you do so long as you don’t disturb their way of life.
 
As a coach my big question is this – is it working?
 
A simple yes or no.
 
If yes, great you crack on.
 
If no, okay then I ask you this – are you happy even though (insert training method) isn’t not working?
 
Delving into why people think s they think will help us become better humans, understanding and taking the time to understand can really bring you a lot of joy in life.
 
People want to be understood, to be asked about their interests, passions and current ‘thing’, so ask them.
 
Just a little consideration to help you connect with people.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Creating Home Gym’s Easily

How has your training looked this week? Swings, snatches, carries, pistols, dips & chins has been mine.
 
Plus a lot of general movements too.
 
There is ample chance to work on the weak links in the chain and bring up some lagging skills, it’s where having a specific goal for those won’t do you too much harm.
 
It does make me wonder though who is sneaking around for secret training sessions, with facility owners being akin to Homer when he became the Beer Baron. 😂
 
For those of us without such a person in our lives, innovation is the key.
 
While a lot went out and panic bought equipment, lining the pockets of online companies to no end there are some who can’t afford that and have been sharing their ideas on instagram.
 
I have to admit there’s been some great ideas.
 
While many are not new and it’s largely a reassurance of vey old school training methods, it’s good to see people actually living up to their claims of – ‘I need variety in my training’.
 
Most who wanted variety often just did the same thing they’d always done because what they really meant was that they wanted something familiar.
 
Here are a couple of truly old school ideas for home gym kit.
 
1 – Towel Trx Tie a couple of towels together, have a thick knot in one end, hang it over a door (that closes towards you), boom, a place to do inverted rows and back training – make two for reverse flies.
 
^ You can also go outside and hang said extended towel off of things for the same effect.
 
2 – Cloth Sliders
 
Get something that slides on your lament flooring, now you have the ability to do core training similar to that on suspension kit (jack knives, pikes, body saws, roll outs), plus you can also do some great posterior chain work in the form of sliding hamstring curls etc.
 
If you only ave carpeted floor this can also be achieved with a piece of cardboard.
 
3 – Pillow Punchbag
 
Get some old pillows, either tie them together or stuff them into a case of some sort, prop it up outside or on something and now you have a nice makeshift punchbag for cardio needs.
 
4 – Slosh Pipe
 
This is a specialty item, basically you’ll need some PVC pipe (4-7ft long), cap one end, then fill it with sand or water (20-40kg is ample), cap the other end you now have a tool that will hit your full body like nothing else you’ve ever felt before.
 
5 – Body Barbell
 
Don’t forget you’ve got your own body as well.
 
The classics such as push ups, squats, pistols, etc are all available to you, as is sprinting on the sport, shadow skipping/boxing, general movement, crawling and even climbing.
 
🤯
 
In all seriousness you’ve got a lot to work with, you just need a little imagination.
 
What nifty little inventions have you created in this rather uncertain time?

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No idea where I was going with this.

Quality or Quantity.
 
Which would you rather have?
 
Both would be nice, yet that’s not the easiest for a lot of people to achieve.
 
Many will sacrifice the former for the latter.
 
As such this has quite the detrimental effect on their nervous system, let us have a quick refresher on this lovely part of human anatomy.
 
Central Nervous System (CNS) – Master of all life
Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) – Limbs & extremities
Somatic Nervous System (SNS) – Muscle control (limbs etc)
Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) – Vital Organ regulation
 
Afferent Nerves (in CNS) – info from body to brain
Efferent Nervers (in CNS) – info from brain to body
 
^ Also CNS/PNS links together with Afferent Sensory Neurones (conducting inward) & Efferent Motor Neurones (conducting outward), basically allowing all those lovely electrical signals/impulses/stimulus to have a chat and regulate your body accordingly.
 
In all of this you’l alls find the Sympathetic & Parasympathetic Nervous Systems (ANS parts).
 
You know these as follows:
 
Freeze, Fight & Flight – Increases chemical/electrical impulse to enhance physical performance.
 
Rest & Restoration (digest) – Regulates the body post excitation, restoring homeostasis for longevity.
 
 
What was the point of this very oversimplified take on the nervous system?
 
To remind you of how complex our body is and that is has a lot of work to do because when most people train or pursue ‘health’ related endeavours they are often tipping the scale of the body towards the side of sympathetic dominance.
 
That leads to fatigue, down regulation in organ function, poor digestion, irregular heart rhythms and constant release of stress related hormones for survival.
 
Rarely is enough time given to the restoration side.
 
Ironically you need to rest to allow the body to communicate within itself and adapt accordingly to the stressor that it has been exposed to.
 
The external stimuli we can provide must be large enough to elicit a neurological response, this is what will adapt first, then from here the message will be fed out to the rest of the body where the other adaptions will take place.
 
Theoretically 😂
 
This all happens when we are recovering and bathing in that parasympathetic dominance, not when we are thrashing ourselves.
 
To constantly train will simply wear you down and grind you into dust, that is the quantity element which sadly is the one people chase and think ‘more is better’.
 
You’d get more response form 3-4 sessions per week of QUALITY work.
 
As opposed to 14 sessions of high quantity.
 
We know this from all the people that train like demons and have nothing to show for it, perhaps you’re one of them, who knows.
 
Here is an example of how to program some high quality work and one with high quantity of work in a logical way.
 
Personally I will use the first option as it’s less wear & tear (static load, wavy volume), yet people like to feel worked, so the second ill be more to the masses like yet it will account for the quantity and allow a high quality by reduction in load.
 
Week 1 – Kettlebell Swing (single arm) -quality approach
 
Session 1 – Volume Test
Session 2 – 40% volume achieved (same load)
Session 3 – 80% volume achieved (same load)
Session 4 – 60% volume achieved (same load)
 
Week 2 –
Session 1 – 60% volume achieved (same load)
Session 2 – 80% volume achieved (same load)
Session 3 – 40% volume achieved (same load)
 
Repeat test from week one from above.
 
Day wise it’d look like this:
 
Mon>Wed>Fri>Sun
Tues>Thur>Sat
 
If you were playing with the load and keeping the total amount of volume you achieve static it may look like this:
 
Week 1 – Kettlebell Swing (single arm) – quantity approach
 
Session 1 – Volume Test – 48kg KB
Session 2 – 40% load – 20kg KB (same volume)
Session 3 – 80% load – 40kg KB (same volume)
Session 4 – 60% load – 28kg KB (same volume)
 
Week 2 –
Session 1 – 60% load – 28kg KB (same volume)
Session 2 – 80% load – 40kg KB (same volume)
Session 3 – 40% load – 20kg KB (same volume)
 
Repeat test from week one from above.
 
Day wise it’d look like this:
 
Mon>Wed>Fri>Sun
Tues>Thur>Sat
 
The Kbs are just rough estimate, you could opt for simply going up or down entire or half poods (1pood =8kg, 1/2 = 4kg).
 
Just some food for thought, you can apply the above to any form of training, be it barbell, bodyweight, kettlebell or other.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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No idea where I was going with this.

Quality or Quantity.
 
Which would you rather have?
 
Both would be nice, yet that’s not the easiest for a lot of people to achieve.
 
Many will sacrifice the former for the latter.
 
As such this has quite the detrimental effect on their nervous system, let us have a quick refresher on this lovely part of human anatomy.
 
Central Nervous System (CNS) – Master of all life
Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) – Limbs & extremities
Somatic Nervous System (SNS) – Muscle control (limbs etc)
Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) – Vital Organ regulation
 
Afferent Nerves (in CNS) – info from body to brain
Efferent Nervers (in CNS) – info from brain to body
 
^ Also CNS/PNS links together with Afferent Sensory Neurones (conducting inward) & Efferent Motor Neurones (conducting outward), basically allowing all those lovely electrical signals/impulses/stimulus to have a chat and regulate your body accordingly.
 
In all of this you’l alls find the Sympathetic & Parasympathetic Nervous Systems (ANS parts).
 
You know these as follows:
 
Freeze, Fight & Flight – Increases chemical/electrical impulse to enhance physical performance.
 
Rest & Restoration (digest) – Regulates the body post excitation, restoring homeostasis for longevity.
 
 
What was the point of this very oversimplified take on the nervous system?
 
To remind you of how complex our body is and that is has a lot of work to do because when most people train or pursue ‘health’ related endeavours they are often tipping the scale of the body towards the side of sympathetic dominance.
 
That leads to fatigue, down regulation in organ function, poor digestion, irregular heart rhythms and constant release of stress related hormones for survival.
 
Rarely is enough time given to the restoration side.
 
Ironically you need to rest to allow the body to communicate within itself and adapt accordingly to the stressor that it has been exposed to.
 
The external stimuli we can provide must be large enough to elicit a neurological response, this is what will adapt first, then from here the message will be fed out to the rest of the body where the other adaptions will take place.
 
Theoretically 😂
 
This all happens when we are recovering and bathing in that parasympathetic dominance, not when we are thrashing ourselves.
 
To constantly train will simply wear you down and grind you into dust, that is the quantity element which sadly is the one people chase and think ‘more is better’.
 
You’d get more response form 3-4 sessions per week of QUALITY work.
 
As opposed to 14 sessions of high quantity.
 
We know this from all the people that train like demons and have nothing to show for it, perhaps you’re one of them, who knows.
 
Here is an example of how to program some high quality work and one with high quantity of work in a logical way.
 
Personally I will use the first option as it’s less wear & tear (static load, wavy volume), yet people like to feel worked, so the second ill be more to the masses like yet it will account for the quantity and allow a high quality by reduction in load.
 
Week 1 – Kettlebell Swing (single arm) -quality approach
 
Session 1 – Volume Test
Session 2 – 40% volume achieved (same load)
Session 3 – 80% volume achieved (same load)
Session 4 – 60% volume achieved (same load)
 
Week 2 –
Session 1 – 60% volume achieved (same load)
Session 2 – 80% volume achieved (same load)
Session 3 – 40% volume achieved (same load)
 
Repeat test from week one from above.
 
Day wise it’d look like this:
 
Mon>Wed>Fri>Sun
Tues>Thur>Sat
 
If you were playing with the load and keeping the total amount of volume you achieve static it may look like this:
 
Week 1 – Kettlebell Swing (single arm) – quantity approach
 
Session 1 – Volume Test – 48kg KB
Session 2 – 40% load – 20kg KB (same volume)
Session 3 – 80% load – 40kg KB (same volume)
Session 4 – 60% load – 28kg KB (same volume)
 
Week 2 –
Session 1 – 60% load – 28kg KB (same volume)
Session 2 – 80% load – 40kg KB (same volume)
Session 3 – 40% load – 20kg KB (same volume)
 
Repeat test from week one from above.
 
Day wise it’d look like this:
 
Mon>Wed>Fri>Sun
Tues>Thur>Sat
 
The Kbs are just rough estimate, you could opt for simply going up or down entire or half poods (1pood =8kg, 1/2 = 4kg).
 
Just some food for thought, you can apply the above to any form of training, be it barbell, bodyweight, kettlebell or other.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Stiff as a board much?

Are you currently what many would consider ‘flexible’?
 
If the answer is yes then this post doesn’t concern you.
 
When a resounding no followed by laughter is the answer then you will do well to keep reading.
 
Since many people will have time at home it’s the perfect opportunity to being a simple daily stretching routine.
 
No excuse of not having time, or life getting in the way, this is the perfect opportunity to create some neurological relaxation and improve your flexibility.
 
Something people get a tad confused about flexibility show it works.
 
You’re not technically making a muscle longer.
 
Think of it logically, your muscles have specific origins and insertions, those don’t anatomically change so you’ll never gain any flexibility past the point of where they find their limit ROM before you start to cause structural damage and compromise ligaments/tendons.
 
What you’re actually doing it creating inhibition/disinhibition..
 
Essentially any excess residual muscle tension is what creates ‘tone’, as tone is tension and tension helps produce force, however that is for another day.
 
You’ll often find the majority of people who are massively flexibly are not that ‘toned’ and those that do have some tone are not as flexible as those that don’t.
 
Now you’ll of course find exceptions to this, yet they’ve often been practicing being strong & flexible for 20 years.
 
Basically dedicating a lifetime to the skills.
 
Knowing the above will help you understand the purpose of stretching more, and also how to make it more effective.
 
To improve flexibility you need to hold close to your current full ROM for as long as possible, that is until the ‘tension’ releases.
 
DON’T FORCE IT!
 
You need to breathe into the stretch, feel the nervous system dow- regulate the tension and allow the muscle to go further.
 
A word or warning though ⚠️
 
Your brain creates tension to protect you.
 
Sometimes it’s not stretching the tight muscle that is needed, it’s strengthening it – we shall discuss this tomorrow.
 
Given you’ve got time try to spend 30-60min stretching, honestly your body will thank you for it,just put on a TV show or podcast and off you go.
 
If you’re looking for stretches then these channels is a good one to get ideas from:
 
 
 
Remember that stretching is a neurological skill, the skill of inhibition/disinhibition.

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Skipping & Strength – V1

Nothing fancy needed, just yourself a skipping rope & ideally somewhere to do pull ups.

You’ll be working on 5min intervals with 2.5min rest.

The interval is as follows:

10 seconds work – 20 seconds rest > 5min

Here is how it is applied –

Session 1 – W/U+C/D 5min each

A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Pull Up 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min
A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Pull Up 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min

Session 2 – W/U+C/D 5min each

A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Push Up 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min
A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Push Up 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min

Session 3 – W/U+C/D 5min each

A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Squats 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min
A1 – Skipping 10(sprint)/20(slow skip – recover) x5min
Rest 2.5min
B1 – Squats 10sec (pull ups)/ 20sec (rest) x5min
Rest 2.5min

Easy peasy.

The Pull/Push/Squat variation can be changed each time, so pistols, single arm push ups, towel pull ups and so on.

A quick 30min that you can also perform multiple times per day.

Enjoy,
Ross

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Book Recommendation

You know I’m a fan of minimalistic training.

Why do more when it can be done with less?

A great book that is worth reading not only for it’s pearls of wisdom training wise, yet also it’s science is ‘The Naked Warrior’ by Pavel Tsatsouline.

It’s a great investment, and the best part is you’ll be able to understand and appreciate ow to use just your bodyweight.

Enjoy,
Ross

You’ll find the link below –

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Form Fixer 3000

Beautifully Boring & Brilliant.
 
I have a question for you.
 
On a scale on 1- dear god my eyes, how would you rate your own lifting form?
 
What you will find below is a little something I’ve used with people to improve their form within three weeks (because it works on a 3-week wave, because I like those).
 
I’ve personally used the above on the following:
 
Swings, Cleans, Power Snatches, Presses, Pull Ups, and a few other movements.
 
⚠️ – Be warned, the volume builds quickly.
 
The overall set up is based on three sessions per week.
 
You can do it with only two sessions, you’d simply find it extends the cycle from 3-weeks to 5-weeks.
 
Here is how it works:
 
– Select 1 prime movement/lift
– Perform singles*
– Each rep must be done with crisp clean form
– Loading 50-70% 1RM (as a guide)
 
*Progressions & rep schemes:
 
Week 1:
Session 1 – 100 singles
Session 2 – 100 doubles
Session 3 – 100 triples
 
Week 2:
Session 1 – 100 doubles
Session 2 – 100 triples
Session 3 – 100 fours
 
Week 3:
Session 1 – 100 triples
Session 2 – 100 fours
Session 3 – 100 fives
 
👆 At this stage you’ve got a choice, you can either change your lift after the 100×5, increase the load or repeat the week 3 if you feel you need more time there.
 
It’s a lot of volume, you’ll find that your accessory lift will do well to fall into the realms of 3×8-12 and simply run everything else as maintenance lifting.
 
This overall idea of this is to solidify your form in one lift/movement.
 
It works especially well with kettlebells and classic barbell lifts as you really learn the skill of the lift and the set up.
 
🤗
 
Give it some thought.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Sudden & Unexpected Change

Fitness and progressing in it can be frustrating.
 
The main reason for this is because results don’t come in drip-fed stages, changes seem to be sudden and large.
 
For the majority anyway.
 
You see we don’t notice the small changes, and to a point neither does our body.
 
We need to get to the point of stress that forces it to adapt and overcome by super-compensating not to the level of the tress provided, it needs to be beyond it.
 
It’s often why we have random PB’s after seeming to be stagnant for ages.
 
You’ll find it’s not unusual for people to suddenly find a 10kg PB on a lift just appears and many are left confused and wondering where on earth it came from.
 
Super-compensation, that’s where.
 
This is the dichotomy of fitness, the law of specificity & the law of accommodation.
 
One states to get better at something you need to do more of it, and the other side of that coin tell you that if you do the same thing over and over you’ll stop progress.
 
Madness.
 
Yet that is where specialised variety, waviness of loading, periodisation and all that other good stuff comes into play.
 
True a lot of PT’s/Coaches don’t ave the foggiest clue about.
 
When it comes to your training this view will be rather different yet provide some interesting avenues of progress to go down.
 
Step 1 – Select a program
Step 2 – Stay on said program until you hit a PB
Step 3 – Once PB achieved do something different
 
Now you will never be world champ of anything, yet you’ll gain a brand range of skills and find that there is a lot of crossover from one goal to the next.
 
Of course if you have an ultra specific goal then go down hat rabbit hole and focus, if not, aim for a PB in something and once you hit it go completely in the other direction.
 
You never know, you might just evolve faster that way.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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