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One for all the SuperMum’s

Mid Morning Mum’s entering in droves with what looks like and endless amount of strollers, buggies and prams.
 
It’s like watching vultures circle as they scope out the coffee shop for a table 😂
 
They might be smiling, however it’s not a smile that says –
 
“Hey, how are you.”.
 
It’s closer to one that says –
 
“Oh, hi, I see you’re finished with tis table even though you’re not. K, thanks, bye.”
 
And now the kids are kicking off crying…. 🤦‍♀️
 
Mum’s truly are superhero’s doing everything they do.
 
I’ve literally just watched one do to much count, 11 things simultaneously, it was very impressive and if I’m honest a little scary.
 
I can barely pee without missing if my concentration drifts, let alone do that many things at once.
 
Mum’s, we salute you.
 
Speaking of these glorious warriors, one topic I often end up engrossed in conversation with them about is getting their pre-baby body back.
 
^^ While not a goal for all of them, it’s a really common one.
 
First things first, having a baby is quite the strenuous experience on the body and utilises a considerable amount of ones resources.
 
True enough some come out fairing better than others, however that’s more a case of individual difference, prior exercise/fitness levels and overall health so if you don’t bounce back straight away don’t stress, it’s okay to take several months to no longer feel like you’ve had your ass kicked.
 
So, how long can ‘getting back’ take?
 
The truth is you can’t get that body back, it’s gone and trying to go backwards just isn’t possible because of the one obvious truth many forget, they’ve just had a baby.
 
The only way to get the body you had back would be to go back in time.
 
So instead of thinking “I need to get back to this.”, think instead about moving forwards to something new and improved 🤗
 
Many will think about going backwards.
 
While an understandable mindset it’s not a healthy one because some end up linking their identity, worth, confidence and overall sense of self to what they were before the little bundle of joy came along.
 
I get it you know, why this train of thought occurs.
 
Tis’ simply because many don’t know any different, and that’s okay however some re-education is needed.
 
Personally I’d always advise hiring someone who specialises in the pre/post-natal field so that you can get the most current, useful and relevant information based on YOUR specific needs and situation.
 
^^ Some have more separation than other, or major hormone disruption, perhaps even joint dislocation and prolonged elevated levels of relaxin, so you’d do well to consult a professional.
 
Another key element to keep in mind is that there’s no need to rush back to a new physical peak.
 
True enough some seem to get there within 8 week post baby, it happens and unless it’s you then you’d do well not to compare yourself to an entirely different human being.
 
So just keep that in mind.
 
From experience there is also not a lot of time for some people, this can lead to all sorts of unwanted stress and is why it’s worth knowing that there is no rush to move forwards.
 
The gym/training mentality if that you NEED to do 60min.
 
Rubbish.
 
You’d be far better off doing 20min sessions daily (you can them mix CV work one day, Strength work another, Movement capability the next and so on).
 
Moving away from conventional wisdom is key here.
 
Just like the little one taking baby steps to build up ones health, strength and fitness is the most optimal way forwards.
 
Doing so will be incredibly manageable and therefore far easier to sustain consistently because even the busiest Super-Mum can find 20min a day for herself to train.
 
Oh, alos as tempting as the glass of wine might be at the end of the say of when babe is asleep, if you’re looking to move forwards a daily glass (or bottle) could be quit ehe heavy anchor dragging behind you, just something worth remembering.
 
^^Same is true for delicious foods, by all means have them, however just remember the more that is consumed the heavier that anchor behind you becomes.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
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Which is better for progress?

– Training until momentary muscular failure

– Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank and doing more sets

– Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts

*Progress typically being strength, hypertrophy, performance related for the context of this post and those who asked.

In truth they’re all viable, in fact you’d probably do well to cycle through phases of doing each in a periodised fashion or you could link them all together in a holistic approach.

Honestly at the stage of lifting most people are at they just need to get their reps in for the most part.

Also before you say it might be dangerous that is only if form is bad, if for is good there’s no real issue.

Let us look at each of the above and see who we can optimally use them.

– Training until momentary muscular failure –

A lot of solid research has been conducted based on the idea that it’s the last few reps (we’ll say the last 2-5) that really give you that much needed hit of adaptive stimulus to grow and every prior rep was just there.

^^ This is relevant for each method in this post.

Now some people would then be lead to think that doing lower rep set would bypass this and go straight to the stimulus.

Fair enough, however it doesn’t work like that.

The above is based on the accumulation of fatigue in the formative reps (depletion of energy system reserves etc) and depending on the rep ranges you use will then link in to the gains you get.

6-20 being said as optimal for hypertrophy.

^^ You can use compound movements however I’d say stick with lifts that have a lower potential for injury until you’re what the books consider an experienced lifter (2 years of solid lifting 3+ times per week).

It’s easier to get close to that momentary failure being meaningful with reps at 8+ I’ve found, less while personally I enjoy is just not viable for people who are not experienced lifters.

While finding the right weight and reps can be a bit of a tricky element (downside), the massive benefit is that you’ll only need a few sets per movement (upside).

Next time you train try this: 3-4 x fail on accessory lifts.

– Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank (RPE work) –

Favoured by many a lifter and great for all movement be those compound, supplementary or isolation.

In short yo’d be going to the point where you feel a bit of a grind beginning to happen. It is at this point over time you’ll learn that you’ve only got 1-2 reps left.

One problem with this though is that people will stop short.

They think they’ve got 1-2 reps left when in reality it’s more like 6-10.

Yes I’m being serious.

The danger here is that people will be leaving gains on the table because for lack of a better term they’re being a little bit soft.

As such this is where in the beginner days having them utilise the ‘going until failure’ is useful (provided they have good form) because they won’t be lifting that heavy so it will be more viable.

Once they’ve learned their limits using more weight and stopping short of failure becomes useful because it then allows more total volume as going to failure with heavier loads causes more overall damage and need more recovery time.

I’m not sorry to say that heavy isn’t relative, heavy is heavy.

Regardless of if you personally feel you lifting say 70kg x5 is the same as someone lifting 250kg x5 it’s not, apples & oranges as they say.

Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank is a great way for the more experience and stronger people to progress because they can add more total volume and build up fatigue over multiple sets.

It means that say 4 of your 6 sets might be the ones that are just there and the last two sets that have reps that are money makers.

^^ All of this is linked in to RPE (rate of perceived exertion), so the next time you train after each set write down on a scale of 1-10 how hard the set was, most of yours will want to be 8/9 on the scale (look up Reactive Training Systems – Mike Tuscherer).

That bring us to the last one.

-Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts-

A Russian weightlifting favourite because I do love the Russians.

This is a great method however it requires people to have been hitting some solid progress for a few years as it will be largely based on low reps and endless sets.

So what is set effort precisely?

Put simply, say your 6RM (rep max) is 100kg meaning you can do 1 set of 6 at 100kg and no more, yet you want to, how can this be done?

Easy, 6RM is 100% set effort, so if you work at 50% efforts you’d be doing sets of 3 reps.

This means you might be able to do 3,4,5,6, or perhaps 20 sets of 3 with your 6RM as opposed to just one set of 6 with your 6RM.

Make sense?

An epic way to train that will leave you feeling fresh at the end of most if not all of your sessions and that’s the dangerous part.

People chase fatigue so as valuable as this method is it doesn’t hit their emotional/cognitive bias and as such they’d end up doing more and burning out.

You’d also have to be well versed in what is known as CAT (compensatory acceleration training) – you lift each rep with everything you’ve got, basically.

*Using CAT on your sets of 3 you’d go until you feel speed of reps is lost, which could be as mentioned above, 3 sets or 23 sets. When speed is lost it means you’ve hit your stills for the day, even if you don’t feel fatigued you are, trust me.

It is this that would provide the stimulus we’ve touched on above.

^^ Fred Hatfield is the man to look up for CAT.

So, which is best?

Based on how long you’ve been lifting:

<2 years: Training until momentary muscular failure

2-4 years: Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank and doing more sets

4 years +: Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts

Not everyone will like this answer and while for some rare exceptions it’s the right answer for the average person.

If like me you’re just an average person then don’t fear doing the simple things.

These days we live in an age where everyone is trying to keep up with everyone else and unless you’re doing HIIT, or some sort of ‘Ultra-Mega-Oblivion Set’ you’re some kind of lesser human.

Yea that’s complete bollocks.

It’s only the highly insecure that feel the need to make their training look more complicated or fancier than is it.

Remember this.

Enjoy,
Ross

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DNA, going beyond your excuses

Last night sported a rather good conversation among some of my fellow training partners.
 
The subject drifted to nutrition and the classic ‘find what works for you.’.
 
Did you know you don’t have to find out via trial and error, you can take a test based on your DNA and find out exactly what your body best responds to and depending how much you’re willing to invest potentially sensitivities and a whole dos too other information as well.
 
We live in a truly amazing world.
 
When in history has someone literally starting out of a journey of health improvement had access to such information?
 
Never is the answer.
 
Before people bitch about cost, it will be between £90-250.
 
People waste that kind of money on Skinny Tea, C9, and a lot of other bullshit, so investing it in a DNA/genetics related test for your health is well worth it.
 
The funny thing is while discussing it I could already hear all the responses people would have.
 
By responses I mean childish moaning and excuses.
 
Let me expand for a second.
 
Say you take said genetic test to know your optimal nutrition protocol (you’d also work with someone to really dial it in), one of the results says that you’re not very tolerant to one of your favourite foods and realistically you might want to curb your enthusiasm for indulging in it as you do.
 
“But…. But… I can’t live without it. Blah Blah Blah.”
 
*Face Palm.
 
The point is you can literally have something written on paper for a specific individual that is 99% what works for them and if it goes against what they WANT to hear/be told they will oppose it, make excuses and act like a child.
 
So these days I just sit and think –
 
“Do you know what, fuck it. You’re not going to listen so I’m not going to waste my time with you because I’m just too tired for the bullshit now.”
 
You see no matter what you can prove to people or how good your intentions are to help them, unless it fits what they want they won’t listen or be willing to make a change.
 
Such madness.
 
Yet that is something that you’re 100% entitled to.
 
So my good people who stick out and read my ramblings (I really do appreciate it you know), if you could have every answer for the questions you want to ask would you really want them?
 
Your clients and people you work with will only want the answers they want (of the most part), just keep this in mind.
 
Anyway I’m off rolling.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
 
***If you want to delve in to the DNA stuff look up these guys: https://www.dnafit.com
 
^^What you get is very eye opening and actually spot on, even if you don’t want it to be, it really is.
 
(I speak from experience on this one as I did it just to see and by jove it was all correct – years of medicals and hospital trips to back it up so I can confirm the info is solid).

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One coffee laden ramble

The internet being what it is can lead people to saying some rather bold things.
 
Some might not even be 100% accurate 🤯
 
Shocking, right?
 
That being said, we’d like to think that the majority of people are trying to be helpful however the might take looking past the endless ‘10% discount with code XXXX’.
 
In fitness everyone wants their slice of the pie.
 
Ironically though they end up doing the same things as everyone else and going for a very slim piece instead of actually trying to be an individual.
 
Despite all the memes about living your true life or becoming the best version of you, most follow the crowd.
 
Following the crowd can seem safe.
 
Safety in numbers and all that.
 
This however doesn’t give much room for reflection or growth though because let us say you read some of your older content and now know it’s complete horse shit.
 
What are you to do?
 
Have a follow up piece where you address past misconceptions and outdated information, or do nothing and not upset the apple cart.
 
Over the years I’ve personally done both.
 
In the salt decade or so it has been the former, however in much younger days the idea of being wrong or at least admitting it was a bitter pill to swallow however that attitude was grown out of.
 
One such topic that needed multiple revisions was nutrition.
 
As more knowledge as gained the simpler it became and despite the average person desperately hoping they had some sort of unique issue that was causing all their issues in truth it was just a lifestyle choice problem.
 
Talking about what you will do, want to do or could do is more than enough for most people to release a hit of dopamine so that they feel good.
 
^^ You know the chats you have while stuffing your face with delicious foods and alcohol and making all the bet promises of ‘starting tomorrow’, which for many never happens.
 
Taking control is hard for some people to do in their own life.
 
Same goes for info shared about fitness on the web.
 
It’s hard to admit that what might be shared could be missing some vital considerations and perhaps isn’t gospel.
 
This is where science/evidence comes in to play.
 
It backs up points, however it too can be abused and manipulated to suit a purpose/cause or prove a point.
 
Given this truth what is the average person to do in regards to knowing what is, what isn’t and what’s just complete turd?
 
Trial & error.
 
Yep, it sucks because there is rarely a definitive answer and you simply need to put time an effort in to things.
 
How much of each?
 
As much as you can spare and what you’ll find is that is just helps build a base, a foundation that everything else can be launched from.
 
You probably heard the old saying that ‘success leaves clues’.
 
^^ This is where listening to the anecdote of those who’ve achieved what you’re trying to is worth your time.
 
It doesn’t mean you need to apply it, however it can be useful to know provided you ask the right question.
 
Classically when you look at someone who is now the success you wish to be you end up asking what they re currently doing to be that successful and while it’s not a terrible question it’s the wrong one to be asking because you’re not in the same place they are.
 
The question you want to ask is this:
 
‘When you were in my position what did you do?’
 
^^ Ask for their original thoughts/avenues taken, problems, successes, sunken costs, wasted time and things they SHOULD have done yet didn’t because they felt at the time they knew better.
 
Much like looking at top level body builders.
 
People want to know their training and nutrition they do now, even though those asking the question are 110lbs newbies.
 
They’d do well to ask what said pro’s did when they were 110lbs and go from there – just to reiterate the point.
 
Anyway just a bit of a ramble today based on some reflective thought.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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To become a Giant, Giant Sets are the answer.

***Old School Wisdom***
 
“You can train hard or long, not both.”
 
This is pretty much true for the majority of people.
 
You might find some genetic freak beasts that can do both however for the rest of us mortals we need to make the choice between putting in a gargantuan effort or a marathon time.
 
Personally I’d pick intensity.
 
Just because you’ll find that often those who are forced to do less better tend to be those who you aspire to be like.
 
As such I’ve got a little gem of training advice for you.
 
Giant Sets.
 
Defined as 4+ exercises for the same muscle group with no rest in-between each movement/exercise until you’ve finished all of them.
 
Here is an example:
 
A1 – Sumo DL x4-6
A2 – Weighted Pull Up x4-6
A3 – RDL x6-8
A4 – Pull Up x6-8
A5 – Rope Pull Through x8-12
A6 – Neutral Grip Pull Up x8-12
A7 – Reverse Fly to failure
A8 – DB Curl to failure
Rest 3-5 min, repeat 2-3 more times.
 
Just lovely.
 
Brutally hard, however lovely all the same.
 
Say this was going to be in a training session I might suggest that someone warms up by doing some barbell cleans and movement flow work.
 
Cleans might ramp up to say a heavy double or triple, perhaps 6-8 total sets and have some crawling pattering after each set.
 
Once that is done (say 15min) you go on to the giant set.
 
They are great time savers and they allow you to work a multitude of rep ranges and according to some (Dr Hatfield & cohorts) it allows you to tax each muscle fibre sufficiently for maximal progress.
 
Personally while I do like that style I’d say in the early days of applying this perhaps stick with a gaol based rep range.
 
Strength = <6 reps, so sets of 2-3, 3-4, 3-5, 4-6 etc.
Hypertrophy = 6-20 reps
Endurance = 15> reps
 
That way the metabolic effect will be largely focused on the same energy system and overall outcome.
 
Once you play with this for a while you will know what rep ranges you can combine based on the movements you use.
 
A good split to follow would be as follows:
 
Day 1 – Pressing
Day 2 – Posterior Chain
Day off
Day 3 – Legs
Day off
Repeat Day 1.
 
You can also set up two giant sets per training session however I’d then limit the total amount of giant sets to 2-3 and perhaps the amount of movements to say 6.
 
Give it some thought.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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5 simple things you should be able to do

How much time do you spend crawling around on the floor or climbing things?
Once upon time the rising fame of Ido Portal took hold.
People across the globe found themselves moving.
This stuck around and is still going strong yet the overall notoriety of it and chatter has diminished, the big question is why?
From an experienced eye it would be this; ego.
While moving is easy enough and there are plenty of regressions that can be put in place the average person doesn’t like feeling stupid, unable to do something or weak.
Supporting your weight on your hands/feet and being in a quadrupedal stance is very humbling for many.
It is at this point the realise the exact place they’re in when compared to someone like Ido who is essentially a movement god.
Sadly knowing just how far you’ve slipped down the ladder of being able to move is a massive hit to a lot of people.
I remember talking to someone about this.
My standpoint is simple: most general movement/exercises are not difficult it’s just that the average person is very unconditioned (weak, overweight, immobile).
^^ This clearly caused offence, even if objectively true for the level of person we were discussing people sadly get too caught up in ‘feelings’.
All of this is only in reference to being on your hands and feet simultaneously, you’ve then got having three, two or one limb on the floor and that is where things really get interesting.
Some will say that as the complexity increases things become more advanced and yet when you see children doing such things without a care in the world can you really say that?
(Obviously there are advanced movements, however in regards to the average person and their ability what is being asked is literally at ‘baby’ level of crawling capability)
Then we have the giant slayer that can tripped a persons mindset.
Climbing a rope without the use of ones legs.
Something we should be able to do, yet many can’t, that should tell you something about the state of the world.
Believe it or not I do understand how it makes people feel.
You know, not being able to do things.
To many it makes them feel like a ‘lesser’ person.
Judged, ridiculed and all the other shameful feelings that are linked together.
The interesting thing with shame and it’s many faces is this; no one can make you feel ashamed unless it’s something that you already feel/believe.
Seriously, I’m sure you know someone who had all the shit thrown at them, people endlessly trying to shame and bring them down, yet they simply shook it off and were not phased by it.
The reason why is simple, to them they had nothing they felt ashamed of or that they need to feel shamed by.
Shame it like guilt, it can’t be forced on you, it’s something you have to allow someone to put on you.
Anyway, back to movement.
Can you do these 5 basic things:
– Climb a rope without using your legs 5-10m
– Bear Crawl unbroken for 50m
– Duck walk 50m unbroken
– Bound Jump your own height along the floor
– Sit in a deep squat for 5min without struggle
Nothing earth shattering or out of the realms of possibly for all people.
Give them a go, once you’ve gotten your confidence from finding out you can do them all try to add just moving to your training.
Start off with 10min per day.
You never know, you might just fall in love with it.
Enjoy,
Ross

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Quotes are well meaning however…

“Do what makes you happy.”

As good as that quote sounds, it’s not very logical 😂

In regards to training I have to admit that it’s far better for someone to train in a way they enjoy because it will be far more sustainable in the long run.

That being said, if the specific goal they have requires specific styles of training that they don’t enjoy then we have a problem.

Personally my view is that how you feel, perform and look will be the result of your lifestyle & training.

They are all interlinked byproducts.

For example; you might be an endurance athlete who can smash endless miles yet your body doesn’t reflect this amazing ability due to the fact you drink like a fish.

Same is true for people who seems themselves as body builders that train like demons and eat like hippos, they may fill out a T-shirt yet it’s mostly wth fat instead of lean mass.

We are the product of our choices.

Thus my question to you lovely people.

Does your health, performance & aesthetic reflect your life choices?

More specifically do those three things reflect what you want or not?

Many wish for more, yet refuse to change to allow it to happen.

A little word of advice before we go.

If you wish to be a certain way then look to those who have that which you seek and do what they do because the mantra of ‘find what works for you’ isn’t as useful as you might think.

Instead just find what works and do that thing.

Give it some thought.

Enjoy,
Ross

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TUT for more progress

If there is one thing you can do to immediately get more results it’s to spend more time under the bar, literally.
 
TUT (time under tension) is a key element in gains.
 
Classic tempo prescription is 4-1-1-0 (eccentric, pause at bottom of lift, concentric, pause at top of lift).
 
The first three are of great importance, the last one can be seen by some as a time for potential rest.
 
In regards to the eccentric portion 2-10 seconds lowering range is good for most people, this can help them start to feel what’s doing on (obviously it will be harder in some lifts vs others).
 
Stopping at the end ROM is where you’ll find people can do ‘Pause Reps’ and anything less than 4 seconds is just to create some control (if they dive bomb a lift).
 
You’ll find that really you’d want to pause for at least 4 seconds to allow the stretch (myotatic) reflex to dissipate. Yep your muscles store that good old potential genetic energy for that long.
 
^^ Have someone else time or put a timer in front of you because no one ever counts their pauses correctly, what they feel is say 4 seconds is actually 1, and what they think is 10 seconds is more like 4 😂
 
In regards to the concentric you’ll find this is typically written as a 1 second movement or an X – this means be as explosive as possible.
 
Top end of the lift is where you simply chill out, re-brace and then do more reps.
 
You can periodise TUT like any other element of training, here are a couple of options I’ve used in the past.
 
Sets & Reps – 4-6×4-6, if all reps hit add 1-2% load
 
Tempo periodisation: Goal – Hypertrophy
 
Weeks 1-3: 8-0-X-0
Weeks 4-6: 6-0-X-0
Weeks 7-9: 4-0-X-0
Week 10 – Deload – 2-0-X-0
Repeat with added load or different rep range
 
You could also play with the pause at the bottom.
 
Sets & Reps – 3-5×3-5, if all reps hit add 1-2% load
 
Tempo periodisation: Goal – Strength
 
Weeks 1-3: 2-4-X-0
Weeks 4-6: 2-6-X-0
Weeks 7-9: 2-8-X-0
Week 10 – Deload – 2-0-X-0
Repeat with added load or different rep range
 
In short, having your body create more tension and spend more time in that state is a good way to progress.
 
Go lighter than you think you should.
 
Like at least 25% off of what you think you can handle because there is always room to add more weight in a cycle.
 
Trying to be a hero and starting off too heavy doesn’t do you any favours.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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An odd little protocol that’s good for strength & conditioning.

If general physical fitness is your goal then you’ll like this.
W/U – Antagonist to your main lift
A1 – Main lift
C/D – Movement Flow
Yep, just three things to do.
You can have a super set of A1/A2 if you like as that also works well.
Here is a little example based on something I did recently with the above.
W/U – Kettlebell Clean & Press – 3-5 reps, 10min
A1 – Deadlift x 5,5,5,5,5,3,3,3,2,2, 20min
C/D – Sandbag Carry & Lizard Crawl (10-20m each), 10min
^^ I tend to stretch or do corrective work while listening to a podcast/watching a seminar in dead time.
You might be wandering what this is all about: 5,5,5,5,5,3,3,3,2,2.
Put simply it is working up to a heavy double with a wavy loading scheme, here is how mine looked doing double overhand sumo DL the other day.
All in KG – 100,130,110,140,120,150,130,160,140,170
Rest was not timed just enough to feel ready and change the plates around.
The W/U & C/D served as extra volume and covered the rest of the body movement wise.
You could run the above 3-5 days per week, I’d go for 3 starting out because you’re training full body each session when you look at it.
The main lift will have a top set of 5-3-2 so pick some lifts you want to improve on, oh and you can keep it the same each time if you wish, I plan on having DL be the main lift each time due to a knee injury and inability to squat without pain.
Try to have some fun with your training, you’l find it’s easier to stay consistent that way.
Enjoy,
Ross

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Bike Ride & Prejudice.

As we bask in the glory of the sun, like moths to the flame the cyclists take to the road.
 
Now there’s never been a problem my end with them until now.
 
Clogging up my pavement with their lycra barely supporting their family jewels 😤
 
Nah I just kidding 😂
 
One thing the sun seems to help many achieve is extra daily activity, be that in the form of cycling, running, swimming, or any outdoor activity.
 
Personally whatever get’s people actually doing something productive in regards to exercise/training is most pleasing to me.
 
These days a great many are caught in the thought that this must be done in the gym.
 
Simply not true.
 
My preferred style of training is outside with kettlebells, sandbags, barbells, ropes (to climb), if it was in a classic sense of training.
 
A truly enjoyable form of training is one where you learn a great amount of skill with it, such as martial arts, movement or that kind of thing.
 
Blending the two can make for quite the enjoyable life.
 
You’ll also be pleasantly surprised at the results too.
 
One thing I’ve tried to teach many is that it’s less about training ABC to achieve XYZ.
 
It’s about deciding what life you want to live and living it.
 
Say you wish to live life X, then the results you’ll have in fitness health, potentially aesthetic and all that other stuff will be the byproduct of the life you live.
 
This often yields a vast amount of experiences that can touch your heart emotionally and end up being unforgettable.
 
Now that my friends is a life well lived.
 
Therefore choose well and if you find your choice isn’t working for you then change it.
 
Simples.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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