Monthly Archives: July 2019

You can do a lot with one plate

Cheeky Challenge that came up in discussion last night:
 
Load a barbell with 1 plate (20 or 25kg), pick one movement and proceed to repeat it for 45min (use a timer).
 
Tally up your total reps, and you can thank me for the DOMS later.
 
I know what some of you may be thinking.
 
“1 plate will be too light on some movements and too heavy on others.”
 
Just so you know, you are 100% correct, especially for strong/advanced lifters.
 
However, for the average gym participant, this provides ample difficulty 🤗
 
Here are a couple of my favourites –
 
– Squat (any variation, FS, OHS are brutal though)
– Floor Press, Push Press, Push Jerk
– Strict Press (if possible)
– Bent-Over Row
– Upright Row
– Power Clean or Power Snatch
– RDL, Stiff Leg DL on Box and Suitcase DL
– Barbell Curl (if you’re a monster)
 
You get the idea.
 
The beauty of this is found in its simplicity.
 
Personally, I would also say that if you feel the need then in the last 15min (if you wish to train for 60min) you can do some isolation work on minor muscles, or you can just go home.
 
The common resistance to this style of lifting meets is that of “Won’t it be boring?”.
 
Usually said by the same people who watch things like Love Island, thus my answer is this; maybe, you’ll just have to try it and find out.
 
An alternative option I quite enjoy, still loading up one plate, is to pick two movements and pair them in a classic antagonist super-set.
 
^^ This gets an epic pump going and feels great.
 
One thing to remember guys is that this is not a magic program or something that will revolutionise training because it’s not meant for that.
 
It is meant to strip away your bullshit and force you to do some good old fashion work.
 
(High work capacity/density)
 
Unless you’re a professional lifter it’s worth remembering that a key element in training is to make it fun, next is to not take it too seriously and thirdly, it’s largely arbitrary.
 
The love of training runs deep in me, yet I am under no illusion that unless you get paid to lift it’s a hobby and nothing more.
 
By all means, enjoy it, have some focus, drive and goals in mind just don’t let them take over your life. Doing so will lead to anxiety and one clue to this is a destination in the upper abdomen with excess fat storage in the lower.
 
Seriously, look at people who take training way too seriously and you’ll see it in all of them.
 
They’re lean, muscular, fit and yet seem a little bloated and have that small fat pocket they just can’t seem to shift.
 
^^ A topic for another day because I’ve waffled.
 
Yea, try the 1 plate challenge, maybe for say 50 sessions.
 
Why 50?
 
Why not 😂
 
Enjoy,
Ross
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Lingering Logical Loopholes

The experiences, expectations and biases we gain over a lifetime lead us to some rather interesting beliefs.
 
We end up thinking, feeling that things should always go a certain way and when there is a slight difference we end up potentially rejecting this new happening/process.
 
Now, this is not to say that what happens is wrong or bad, it’s just different.
 
Different doesn’t mean pain-free or without discomfort.
 
After all, learning or accepting how to learn that there are more than a select few ways of getting a result is not always easy, yet it’s often worth it.
 
The above thought came from a small epiphany I had.
 
If you’ve followed these ramblings over the years you’ll have noticed the programming element has undergone some drastic growth and a couple of days ago a large piece of the puzzle finally got put in the correct place.
 
Upon writing down various numbers, in-fact letting it all flow out and just ‘happen’ is the best way to describe it.
 
What was in front of me made sense, and so did all of the other documents, books and programs I’d read over the years. At last, I didn’t just see the pattern, I understood it.
 
I will tell you something funny though.
 
Even in knowing what was now on the paper right in front of me and the reasons why it would work, in the back of my mind this thought cropped up: “It looks too easy.”.
 
Coming from a background that held the attitude and belief that ‘hard work trumps all’ and ‘do more, do better’, it was apparent this still held some sway, even knowing better.
 
These days I personally try to follow the tome of “Do less better than more worse.”.
 
Still, that thought of something looking too easy still cropped up.
 
Funny, right?
 
Letting go of outdated beliefs is one of the hardest things we can do, and it will take time yet be 100% worth it in the end.
 
What old notions (if any) do you find pop up, even if you know better?
 
Leave your thoughts below.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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The problem with making your passion your purpose/profession.

 
You see this in fitness all the time.
 
People start up a fitness business because it is their passion and all they want to do is help people.
 
While this is all very nobel and altruistic it has a glaring flaw.
 
If someone is truly passionate that is.
 
This little shred of wisdom is often forgotten in the passion fuelled haze of progress –
 
Not everyone shares your passion, nor do they want to share it and as such they don’t want what you have to offer.
 
^^ Newer people and even some older ones in fitness take this personally when they really shouldn’t.
 
Why?
 
It’s not personal, it’s just business.
 
That’s the problem with making your passion your business.
 
It’s your passion, not everyone else’s and trying to force people to feel the same way you do about XYZ is a surefire way to crash and burn.
 
Now I’m not saying that you shouldn’t care about what you do, however you do need a healthy amount of disconnect from it and to understand that if you do decide to make your business something that surrounds that which makes your heart sing that you might be doing a solo.
 
This isn’t aimed at shitting on your dreams.
 
It’s aimed at giving you a dose or reality because I’ve seen so many people fail and it’s not something wanted for you, or anyone embarking down the route of running a fitness business to be fair.
 
Fail to heed this warning at your own peril.
 
You’d also do well to remember that this is said from experience because it just so just so happened that this befell me and it took years to understand.
 
As such I failed my way to success 🤦‍♀️
 
So if you wish to make it in the endeavour above you must not only make the focus of your work YOUR passion, you must make it appeal to the passion(s) of your target audience/clients/buyers.
 
It’s less about you and almost always all about THEM.
 
Keep this in mind and you’ll find your dreams don’t end up in the dumpster like many others have before yours were even dreamt up.
 
Be passionate, just also remember to be vigilant.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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You don’t need to know this, yet you probably should if you’re a PT

How much thought do you give to your programming?

Like honestly, how much?

Being someone who’s no longer shiny new in this industry I’ve given quite some extensive time and thought to programming over the years.

In doing so I’ve seen some rather interesting patterns.

Today I’d like to touch on a few of them.

All of which I’d seen in literally one of the first books I read.

I know right, it took almost 2 decades before all the pieces began to click in to place and these random (not really random) numbers made sense.

Up until this point most of the programs I’d done were largely copies of what successful protocols cropped up.

While the numbers I’d give people made sense, if I was truly asked why I could probably give at least 60% of the full answer, however the rest was still a little ambiguous.

Anyway, hopefully this info will help you learn faster than I did.

That is if you’re will to learn.

Key Principles:

– Total Volume (weekly/monthly % of total lifts)
– Waviness of Loads
– Same yet Different (exercise transference)

We shall start with the last point as it’s the easiest to grasp.

You pick movements that are similar enough to allow progress yet different enough to avoid overuse injury.

I know, very simple and once you base your training programs on movement patterns (needs) you’ll never be stuck on exercise selection.

If you only program based on exercise then you’ll be stuck in the realm of frustration.

Example: Front Squat > Squat > SBBS > Hack Squat

^^ All the same yet different that allow you to progress, working these in 2-3 week blocks is good. You can do more if you choose however that will differ based on the goal/needs of the client.

Next up Waviness of Loads, also called loading variability or periodisation.

Put simply you use different % of your max to avoid overuse/stagnation. That said there is more to it.

You could keep the load the same and play with the effort of the set based on the RM (repetition max) or vary the relative intensity (% of RM compared to 1RM)

Example: Set effort with static RM.

Say your 10RM is 100kg, meaning that is 100% effort and you’d only be able to do one set at that weight with that amount of reps for the day.

You can take 3 rep ranges and translate these to Heavy-Light-Medium days, like this:

H: 7-9reps, w/10RM loading
L: 1-3reps, w/10RM loading
M: 4-6reps, w/10RM loading

The load stays static, you can plan days with higher effort/intensity levels which might have lower total sets/volume and others that have low reps and all the sets.

While the load is the same the result/stimulus you’d get would be different, yet similar (one you can focus on form and acceleration with low fatigue, the other TUT and mental toughness).

This is one methods of playing with the programs loading, or at least how it feels and how often you can repeat effort with heavier loads.

Second option –

Example: Using 85% of your 5RM (which is 85% 1RM)

Relative intensity ^^ that is what this is.

Most see 5x5x85% 1RM written and this is actually not quite right because if 85% of your 1RM is the weight you can do for 5 reps (5RM) once then you’ll have no chance of doing it for 5 sets.

Instead we take 85% of our 5RM and start there.

If your 5RM, 85% 1RM is 100kg, then you’d take 85% of that which would be 85kg which is about 70% of our fictional 1RM.

This will give you room to progress eat week by adding load, as one option of progress.

In your programs you can use the above to vary the loading in a logical fashion.

(If you like numbers then relative intensity is for you, if not then playing with the effort % of a set in the H-L-M format will be better).

Right, now for the tricky one – Total Volume & weekly/monthly % of total lifts.

This is the real tricky one to grasp.

There are 4 numbers to remember for breaking down your total monthly volume in to weekly needs: 15/22/28/35.

These numbers are % of total volume based on each week.

If we have say 200 total reps you wish to achieve in a specific lift for that month, say the squat, here is how it would look:

Month 1:
* On week 15% of 200 = 30
* On week 2 28% of 200 = 56
* On week 3 35% of 200 = 70
* On week 4 22% of 200 = 44

^^ So now you know how many reps to do each week.

Up next is how many sessions per week – 3 is good.

You breakdown your total weekly volume in to each session like this:

Week 1 % of weekly volume –
* Day #1 is say 33%
* Day #2 can be 25%
* Day #3 on the last day you put the remaining 42%

Week 1 reps per session –
* Day #1 – 10 reps
* Day #2 – 7 reps
* Day #3 – 13 reps
^^ add them up and you get your 30 total reps.

(This is without planning sets/reps/loads, which you can use the above info for your required lift)

After month one you may want to increase the total volume as that might be your focus of progress while keeping the lads the same (say 10RM example from above), if so add 10-20% total volume – it means you need to reestablish the monthly/weekly numbers and also sets/reps etc however that’s programming folks.

There you have it, programming in a rather tough nutshell.

I know, it’s quite a lot to consider and this doesn’t even take in to account accessory work, recovery needs, CV or a great many other things you need to be mindful of.

This is where you’ll find a good program takes time to write, especially if it’s truly a personalised one.

You might have seen I pop up generic programs/protocols for free rather often and while they all work they’ll only really be good for beginners, if you wanted one to consider the above you’d be paying a hefty fee, lol.

Anyway, there you have it, how programming actually works.

If you have a trainer you’d hope that they know the above.

If you are the trainer then I hope you know the above.

Fee free to pop any questions below.

Enjoy,
Ross

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Life is Chess, You are a pawn

“I do not wish for immortal glory. Nor to have my name etched in histories unbreakable stone. All that I seek is keep moving forwards, to become better. Not the best, just better because it’s all I can do in this life.”
 
In response – “So why don’t you then?”
 
How many times have you heard people talk a good game only to 180 on their own altruistic and nobel words.
 
It’s easy to talk the talk, yet actually putting one foot in front of the other, well that’s where shit gets hard.
 
So many are ‘could have beens’ in this life.
 
They waste their natural gifts because it’s easier to embrace the fantasy of ‘what if’ or ‘if only’ instead of embracing the bitter reality of ‘what is’.
 
A lot of people I know talk about what they want, some even go as far as getting it and then upon the realisation that it doesn’t solve all their problems they react in one of two ways.
 
– Stagnation
– Regression
 
Those who fall in to the comfort zone of the first try to live of their minor achievement for the rest of their days, and for a time it works yet eventually people get tired of listening to stories of their glory days because they’re so far in the past they’re not longer relevant.
 
The people who sink in to the sands of regression.
 
It is for those people I truly feel for.
 
Getting that which they sought the most, hoping it would fix everything only to find it didn’t and that intact the problem wasn’t something they could fix externally and that it was something deep inside all along.
 
Something that was broken, that needed to be accepted and perhaps even leg go of, alas it’s too late for that now.
 
In a panic they try to regain what they now feel is lost and try to regress to their former self, yet all the end up doing is becoming a shadow of that and fall even deeper in to their own self cerated abyss and hell.
 
Life is always going to be about choice.
 
With choice comes a direction and all that we can hope is that it takes us forwards.
 
True enough some will take us sideways, yet even those are better than staying still, however none can lead us backwards because like the retro games of the past you can only move forwards and that which came before is now cut off forever.
 
Unlike a game though life has no reset button and you have to live with your decision, like it or not that’s how life goes.
 
How many times have you wanted to go back?
 
Once, twice, hundreds?
 
In any of these lamenting moments did you ever stop and ask yourself why you wanted to go back?
 
Was it because that pain and suffer was familiar and that you’d developed just enough coping mechanisms to allow survival or was it because of something else, cowardice & fear perhaps?
 
My dear people who read these ramblings, do you resonate with any of the above or is it just me in my madness who has felt this?
 
Either way take heed of my words, you can only move forwards and regardless of wether you do or you don’t everything else will because time waits for no one.
 
Remember this.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Anime Strong

100 push ups, 100 squat, 100 sit-ups & a 10k run, everyday for 3 years.

^^ That is what Saitama did to become the worlds strongest man, if only it was that easy in real life.

In most anime shows you’ll find that training is consistent, with purpose and drive.

Now training daily is something you can indeed do, either by picking one movement per day or setting up some sort of rotating split, all are viable however I’m going to give you a challenge and only the most committed and willing will be able to do it.

You’ll have 7 main movements to practice daily (pick one or two of them).

You will never do them to fatigue, the aim is to get better with every set, stronger with every rep and then once ever 10th session of the given movement you go all out and either hit a new max effort, top end weight, total about of reps or time under tension.

There is then the additional option of doing a sport, martial art or some form of fun hobby/endeavour with the rest of your time.

1 – Hand Balancing (2 hands, single hand etc)
2 – Rope Climbing
3 – Sprinting
4 – Deadlift
5 – Pistol Squats
6 – Movement Flows (crawling, climbing, loaded carries, jump sequences etc)
7 – Explosively Throwing

You’d simply pick one or two of the above to practice each day (two is my choice).

Okay, now for the interesting bit, how to program it all, you will have three options.

1 – Do 30-90min once per day – vary the reps/time/distance etc every set
2 – Multiple 10min sessions during the day (minimum of 3)
3 – Perform one set of say no more than 2-3reps for 2-3sets (or 2-3 sets of  10-30 seconds for balances/carries/flows etc) every hour you’re awake.

Easy enough to do, however the trick is to be consistent, patient and see each day/movement as practice, plus just have some fun with it.

Try it for 100 days if you feel that being anime strong is a title you’d not mind having.

Enjoy,
Ross

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You don’t need to be the best, just be better.

Handstand press ups*, pull ups, pistols and sprinting.
 
You could forge a strong, lean, athletic body with those 4 simple movements.
 
A bouns is that they all can be done away from a gym and without any kit, well less for finding somewhere to hang to do pull ups that is.
 
*What many see as a handstand push up is actually a headstand push up as the head touches the floor shortening ROM, a true handstand push up would have your head pass the line of you hands (think hands on boxes with a gap for your head).
 
Given the endless amount of options we have to crave body out of fine marble the big question is this; why do so many struggle?
 
Well my friends there is one answer possessed by this weary soul.
 
It’s not the only answer, however for many it’s the right one.
 
Are your ready for it…..
 
You simply don’t want ‘it’ enough.
 
The ‘it’ can be anything to you however the simple truth is that you just don’t want to achieve success the badly.
 
I know right, what a dick.
 
You are a literal miracle of creation as are many others and if you take just one minute to look around you you’ll see just how many people have taken this for granted and wasted the gift they were given.
 
How can you tell?
 
Poor posture, sloppy movement, obesity, ill health (from lifestyle choice, not unfortunate circumstance or medical issue).
 
People pissing away their lives is everywhere to be seen.
 
Yet even in knowing this and instead of taking some responsibility for their own self they make excuses, dillydally and just generally let themselves rot away all under the guise of –
 
“If only I had XYZ/perfect set of circumstances things would be different.”
 
No, they wouldn’t be different because you’d not change.
 
If you haven’t changed yet why would you change now?
 
Typically two answers become relevant to this ^^
 
1 – Fear (they got scared in to change)
2 – Th pain they currently live with finally because too much
 
The truth is that no one likes to be told they’re only folly and yet it’s not that they’re unaware of it’s existence, they just choose to be ignorant and find any/every excuses to justify their weakness and fragility.
 
Given the above an dhow easy it is to make change to yourself, why don’t you do it?
 
Remember you don’t need a gym (as shown above).
 
You can buy some kettlebells, sandbags or even weights for you own home (you don’t need a full kitted out gym, just enough to challenge you) and proceed to do 15-20min daily practice/movement.
 
15-20min a day, everyone who isn’t an invalid has time for that, what they lack is the desire.
 
Give the above some consideration.
 
Reflect on your excuses, then take a look at yourself in the mirror and say these simple words:
 
“I’m done listening to & believing your bullshit. From now on I’m going to do better. I’m going to be better. I may never be the best, but I will be better tomorrow than I am today.”
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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One for all the SuperMum’s

Mid Morning Mum’s entering in droves with what looks like and endless amount of strollers, buggies and prams.
 
It’s like watching vultures circle as they scope out the coffee shop for a table 😂
 
They might be smiling, however it’s not a smile that says –
 
“Hey, how are you.”.
 
It’s closer to one that says –
 
“Oh, hi, I see you’re finished with tis table even though you’re not. K, thanks, bye.”
 
And now the kids are kicking off crying…. 🤦‍♀️
 
Mum’s truly are superhero’s doing everything they do.
 
I’ve literally just watched one do to much count, 11 things simultaneously, it was very impressive and if I’m honest a little scary.
 
I can barely pee without missing if my concentration drifts, let alone do that many things at once.
 
Mum’s, we salute you.
 
Speaking of these glorious warriors, one topic I often end up engrossed in conversation with them about is getting their pre-baby body back.
 
^^ While not a goal for all of them, it’s a really common one.
 
First things first, having a baby is quite the strenuous experience on the body and utilises a considerable amount of ones resources.
 
True enough some come out fairing better than others, however that’s more a case of individual difference, prior exercise/fitness levels and overall health so if you don’t bounce back straight away don’t stress, it’s okay to take several months to no longer feel like you’ve had your ass kicked.
 
So, how long can ‘getting back’ take?
 
The truth is you can’t get that body back, it’s gone and trying to go backwards just isn’t possible because of the one obvious truth many forget, they’ve just had a baby.
 
The only way to get the body you had back would be to go back in time.
 
So instead of thinking “I need to get back to this.”, think instead about moving forwards to something new and improved 🤗
 
Many will think about going backwards.
 
While an understandable mindset it’s not a healthy one because some end up linking their identity, worth, confidence and overall sense of self to what they were before the little bundle of joy came along.
 
I get it you know, why this train of thought occurs.
 
Tis’ simply because many don’t know any different, and that’s okay however some re-education is needed.
 
Personally I’d always advise hiring someone who specialises in the pre/post-natal field so that you can get the most current, useful and relevant information based on YOUR specific needs and situation.
 
^^ Some have more separation than other, or major hormone disruption, perhaps even joint dislocation and prolonged elevated levels of relaxin, so you’d do well to consult a professional.
 
Another key element to keep in mind is that there’s no need to rush back to a new physical peak.
 
True enough some seem to get there within 8 week post baby, it happens and unless it’s you then you’d do well not to compare yourself to an entirely different human being.
 
So just keep that in mind.
 
From experience there is also not a lot of time for some people, this can lead to all sorts of unwanted stress and is why it’s worth knowing that there is no rush to move forwards.
 
The gym/training mentality if that you NEED to do 60min.
 
Rubbish.
 
You’d be far better off doing 20min sessions daily (you can them mix CV work one day, Strength work another, Movement capability the next and so on).
 
Moving away from conventional wisdom is key here.
 
Just like the little one taking baby steps to build up ones health, strength and fitness is the most optimal way forwards.
 
Doing so will be incredibly manageable and therefore far easier to sustain consistently because even the busiest Super-Mum can find 20min a day for herself to train.
 
Oh, alos as tempting as the glass of wine might be at the end of the say of when babe is asleep, if you’re looking to move forwards a daily glass (or bottle) could be quit ehe heavy anchor dragging behind you, just something worth remembering.
 
^^Same is true for delicious foods, by all means have them, however just remember the more that is consumed the heavier that anchor behind you becomes.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Which is better for progress?

– Training until momentary muscular failure

– Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank and doing more sets

– Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts

*Progress typically being strength, hypertrophy, performance related for the context of this post and those who asked.

In truth they’re all viable, in fact you’d probably do well to cycle through phases of doing each in a periodised fashion or you could link them all together in a holistic approach.

Honestly at the stage of lifting most people are at they just need to get their reps in for the most part.

Also before you say it might be dangerous that is only if form is bad, if for is good there’s no real issue.

Let us look at each of the above and see who we can optimally use them.

– Training until momentary muscular failure –

A lot of solid research has been conducted based on the idea that it’s the last few reps (we’ll say the last 2-5) that really give you that much needed hit of adaptive stimulus to grow and every prior rep was just there.

^^ This is relevant for each method in this post.

Now some people would then be lead to think that doing lower rep set would bypass this and go straight to the stimulus.

Fair enough, however it doesn’t work like that.

The above is based on the accumulation of fatigue in the formative reps (depletion of energy system reserves etc) and depending on the rep ranges you use will then link in to the gains you get.

6-20 being said as optimal for hypertrophy.

^^ You can use compound movements however I’d say stick with lifts that have a lower potential for injury until you’re what the books consider an experienced lifter (2 years of solid lifting 3+ times per week).

It’s easier to get close to that momentary failure being meaningful with reps at 8+ I’ve found, less while personally I enjoy is just not viable for people who are not experienced lifters.

While finding the right weight and reps can be a bit of a tricky element (downside), the massive benefit is that you’ll only need a few sets per movement (upside).

Next time you train try this: 3-4 x fail on accessory lifts.

– Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank (RPE work) –

Favoured by many a lifter and great for all movement be those compound, supplementary or isolation.

In short yo’d be going to the point where you feel a bit of a grind beginning to happen. It is at this point over time you’ll learn that you’ve only got 1-2 reps left.

One problem with this though is that people will stop short.

They think they’ve got 1-2 reps left when in reality it’s more like 6-10.

Yes I’m being serious.

The danger here is that people will be leaving gains on the table because for lack of a better term they’re being a little bit soft.

As such this is where in the beginner days having them utilise the ‘going until failure’ is useful (provided they have good form) because they won’t be lifting that heavy so it will be more viable.

Once they’ve learned their limits using more weight and stopping short of failure becomes useful because it then allows more total volume as going to failure with heavier loads causes more overall damage and need more recovery time.

I’m not sorry to say that heavy isn’t relative, heavy is heavy.

Regardless of if you personally feel you lifting say 70kg x5 is the same as someone lifting 250kg x5 it’s not, apples & oranges as they say.

Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank is a great way for the more experience and stronger people to progress because they can add more total volume and build up fatigue over multiple sets.

It means that say 4 of your 6 sets might be the ones that are just there and the last two sets that have reps that are money makers.

^^ All of this is linked in to RPE (rate of perceived exertion), so the next time you train after each set write down on a scale of 1-10 how hard the set was, most of yours will want to be 8/9 on the scale (look up Reactive Training Systems – Mike Tuscherer).

That bring us to the last one.

-Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts-

A Russian weightlifting favourite because I do love the Russians.

This is a great method however it requires people to have been hitting some solid progress for a few years as it will be largely based on low reps and endless sets.

So what is set effort precisely?

Put simply, say your 6RM (rep max) is 100kg meaning you can do 1 set of 6 at 100kg and no more, yet you want to, how can this be done?

Easy, 6RM is 100% set effort, so if you work at 50% efforts you’d be doing sets of 3 reps.

This means you might be able to do 3,4,5,6, or perhaps 20 sets of 3 with your 6RM as opposed to just one set of 6 with your 6RM.

Make sense?

An epic way to train that will leave you feeling fresh at the end of most if not all of your sessions and that’s the dangerous part.

People chase fatigue so as valuable as this method is it doesn’t hit their emotional/cognitive bias and as such they’d end up doing more and burning out.

You’d also have to be well versed in what is known as CAT (compensatory acceleration training) – you lift each rep with everything you’ve got, basically.

*Using CAT on your sets of 3 you’d go until you feel speed of reps is lost, which could be as mentioned above, 3 sets or 23 sets. When speed is lost it means you’ve hit your stills for the day, even if you don’t feel fatigued you are, trust me.

It is this that would provide the stimulus we’ve touched on above.

^^ Fred Hatfield is the man to look up for CAT.

So, which is best?

Based on how long you’ve been lifting:

<2 years: Training until momentary muscular failure

2-4 years: Leaving 1-2 reps in the tank and doing more sets

4 years +: Not going anywhere near failure staying at <% set efforts

Not everyone will like this answer and while for some rare exceptions it’s the right answer for the average person.

If like me you’re just an average person then don’t fear doing the simple things.

These days we live in an age where everyone is trying to keep up with everyone else and unless you’re doing HIIT, or some sort of ‘Ultra-Mega-Oblivion Set’ you’re some kind of lesser human.

Yea that’s complete bollocks.

It’s only the highly insecure that feel the need to make their training look more complicated or fancier than is it.

Remember this.

Enjoy,
Ross

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DNA, going beyond your excuses

Last night sported a rather good conversation among some of my fellow training partners.
 
The subject drifted to nutrition and the classic ‘find what works for you.’.
 
Did you know you don’t have to find out via trial and error, you can take a test based on your DNA and find out exactly what your body best responds to and depending how much you’re willing to invest potentially sensitivities and a whole dos too other information as well.
 
We live in a truly amazing world.
 
When in history has someone literally starting out of a journey of health improvement had access to such information?
 
Never is the answer.
 
Before people bitch about cost, it will be between £90-250.
 
People waste that kind of money on Skinny Tea, C9, and a lot of other bullshit, so investing it in a DNA/genetics related test for your health is well worth it.
 
The funny thing is while discussing it I could already hear all the responses people would have.
 
By responses I mean childish moaning and excuses.
 
Let me expand for a second.
 
Say you take said genetic test to know your optimal nutrition protocol (you’d also work with someone to really dial it in), one of the results says that you’re not very tolerant to one of your favourite foods and realistically you might want to curb your enthusiasm for indulging in it as you do.
 
“But…. But… I can’t live without it. Blah Blah Blah.”
 
*Face Palm.
 
The point is you can literally have something written on paper for a specific individual that is 99% what works for them and if it goes against what they WANT to hear/be told they will oppose it, make excuses and act like a child.
 
So these days I just sit and think –
 
“Do you know what, fuck it. You’re not going to listen so I’m not going to waste my time with you because I’m just too tired for the bullshit now.”
 
You see no matter what you can prove to people or how good your intentions are to help them, unless it fits what they want they won’t listen or be willing to make a change.
 
Such madness.
 
Yet that is something that you’re 100% entitled to.
 
So my good people who stick out and read my ramblings (I really do appreciate it you know), if you could have every answer for the questions you want to ask would you really want them?
 
Your clients and people you work with will only want the answers they want (of the most part), just keep this in mind.
 
Anyway I’m off rolling.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
 
***If you want to delve in to the DNA stuff look up these guys: https://www.dnafit.com
 
^^What you get is very eye opening and actually spot on, even if you don’t want it to be, it really is.
 
(I speak from experience on this one as I did it just to see and by jove it was all correct – years of medicals and hospital trips to back it up so I can confirm the info is solid).

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