Tag Archives: strength training

A little S&C for free.

Morning All,
 
Typically I will try and throw out various methods and bits of info for people to take away and try.
 
No specific reason for it other than if an idea crops up it might as well be shared.
 
You may find some of the older programs below useful.
 
You may not, either way they’re there.
 
One thing I have noticed in the age of the internet is the abundance of info and free stuff, it’s quite the time to be alive.
 
The slight issue is that it means people don’t go looking for the right info, just what they want to read.
 
Take some free training sessions people share.
 
Most are high volume bollocks that has no rhyme or reason.
 
There is little focus on developing much of anything in their training and it’s all for the attention.
 
While it is true there’s many ways to the top of the fitness mountain each one needs strength.
 
Here in lies the problem, people don’t want to get strong.
 
As such this little protocol today is focused on that very thing, with some added extra for those who want to leave feeling their heart race (because people are addicted to feeling that they’ve done something).
 
– Main Movement(s): 2-3-5
– Accessory Movement: Time or Distance Goal
– Conditioning Element: Optional sprint protocol
 
You might be wandering what I mean by 2-3-5 in the main movement, it’s pretty simple yet will be rather scary to some people.
 
You literally just to a set of two, then rest, then a set of 3 and rest some more and finish with a tough set of 5.
 
Yep, the 2 & 3 are your warm up sets.
 
This goes against conventional wisdom and that’s why it works.
 
You’ll need to have some focus as this doesn’t give you the option of pissing about.
 
Here is an example day with 2 main lifts performed as a super set (you can pick as main man lifts as you choose and perhaps have easier ones to potentiate harder ones).
 
A1 – Deadlift 2-3-5 Rest 120 seconds
A2 – Press 2-3-5 Rest 120 seconds
B1 – Famers Walk 10min x20m carries
C1 – Rowing Interval 8/12 x5min
 
Simple.
 
Depending only our time you can be in and out of the gym in 20min or stretch it to 45, that’s up to you.
 
In regards to progression (if you keep the movements the same) add 2-3% to your top lift each session and milk it for all its worth.
 
Funny how many people miss that little gem.
 
If something is still progressing and producing results stick with it as long as possible.
 
^^ On average a lift/movement does well for about 6 sessions for most people and then needs changing as a guide.
 
Take a read on the above and leave your thoughts below.
 
If this isn;t for you that’s cool however I’d like you to take away one thing; train for strength first and foremost because being weak isn’t good and will lead to an early grave.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
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A quick little bit of info on three ways you can split up some basic linear progression.

1 – Single Progression
2 – Double Progression
3 – Triple Progression
 
These can be tweaked using your understanding of the key principles of overload.
 
– Volume
– Intensity
– Density
 
(Specificity & Frequency also play a part)
 
Here is an example of how all three are written out.
 
*You add load once you’ve hit all the desired reps.
 
Single Progression = 3×8 💪
 
Once you hit 8 reps in each set you add weight, simple.
 
Double Progression = 3×8-12 💪💪
 
Starting out you might hit something like this: 11,9,8
 
The next session it might be : 12,11,9, get the idea?
 
Once you hit 12,12,12, you add load to the bar.
 
Triple Progression = 3-5×8-12💪💪💪
 
I’m sure you can see the pattern now. You want to hit 3×12 then you add a set and work towards 4×12 and finally 5×12 before adding load, however here is how things might look:
 
Session 1 – 12,12,10
Session 2 – 12,12,12 + 1 set next session
Session 3 – 12,12,10,8
Session 4 – 12,12,11,10
Session 5 – 12,12,12,11
Session 6 – 12,12,12,12 + 1 set next session
Session 7 – 12,12,12,12,10
Session 8 – 12,12,12,12,12 + load, drop back to 3×8-12
 
Personally I’m quite the fan of double and triple progression as they have their own built in de-loads via volume reduction.
 
The above deals quite nicely with Volume (total sets/reps) and Intensity (% of RM or load) for progression methods.
 
That leaves us with looking at density (work per unit of time/work capacity), this is easy to program in if you want to have people build al little more conditioning before adding load.
 
We will use double progress with a density consideration as the example.
 
3×8-12, 90-30 seconds rest.
 
Here is what the details might look like written down:
 
Session 1 – 8,8,8 – 90 seconds rest between sets
Session 2 – 12,10,8 – 90 seconds rest between sets
Session 3 – 12,12,12 – Rest as above, drop rest by 30sec
Session 4 – 12, 8,8 – 60 seconds rest between sets
Session 5 – 12,10,8 – 60 seconds rest between sets
Session 6 – 12,12,12 – Rest as above, drop erst by 30sec
Session 7 – 12,8,8 – 30 seconds rest between sets
Session 8 – 12,10,8 – 30 seconds rest between sets
Session 9 – 12,12,12 – Add load, take rest back to 90sec & reps back to 3×8
 
Hopefully that’s nice and clear.
 
Oh yea, frequency and specificity.
 
Specificity is linked directly to the goal (or the movement progressions) and you can use the progressions above and change the movement to make it more or less specific to the goal.
 
For example, You want to increase your press overhead.
 
Double Progression – Press until reps/set/rest hit however instead of adding load you change the lift to one that allows more load.
 
So it may look like this:
 
KB Bottom Up Press > KB Press > Z Press > BB Press
 
And so on.
 
Frequency is the easiest to play with , however it can lead to burn out if you abuse it.
 
Frequency = more training days on your desired goal.
 
EG 2 pressing days becomes 3 pressing days becomes 4 pressing days, using double progression it might look like this.
 
Press 2xP/W – 3×8-12 – goal hit +1 pressing day, load stays the same
 
Press 3xP/W – 3×8-12 – goal hit +1 pressing day, load stays the same
 
Press 4xP/W – 3×8-12 – – goal hit, increase load and drop back to 2 pressing days per week.
 
^^ That is without playing with density by the way.
 
As you can see once you apply the basic principles to even the simplest set/reps systems you have a method of programming that can literally last you a lifetime.
 
The thing about the above is that it’s all fundamental.
 
Mastery of the basics such as these will take you a long way.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Nice Snatch

The kettlebell snatch is one of my favourite movements.
 
While there are many subtle tweaks you can apply in your form they all stem from two styles of snatch with a kettlebell:
 
1 – Hard Style
2 – Sport Style
 
The first is meant to generate more ‘power’ and make you stronger overall while still getting a good solid amount of volume in and increasing your work capacity.
 
The second is all about efficiency of movement so that you can get the most reps in a given time period (typically 10min in the snatch section of the Biathlon, only one hand change is allowed).
 
You might want to know which is better.
 
The classic answer is this; it depends on the goal.
 
While this is indeed the case it’s a cop out answer for people who don’t want to state a preference. Over the years I’ve done both many times and these days I lean towards doing the sport variation more.
 
Why you ask?
 
Because it feels more comfortable with the sport bells.
 
When I grab my cast iron ones I will often opt for the hard style snatch as the handles and dimensions are more forgiving for it.
 
Here are the two in action side by side:
 
 
Notice how the sport style on the left emphasises fluidity and pacing which the hard style is more about oomph.
 
Both are good, both have pros & cons, you simply have to decide which is better for you and your goal.
 
Snatching works well in many ways.
 
– Ladders: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 both arms
– Time Blocks 5-20min
– Intervals 30/30-60rest
– Straight Sets 10×20 per arm
– Pacing per min: 60 seconds for 15 reps L/R x10min
 
The options are endless.
Snatches work best when largely focused on density in training.
 
One things both can agree is that there will be a great benefit to your shoulder health, strength, conditioning, body composition and overall athleticism when this glorious movement is added to your training.
 
Hitting some snatch work 2-3 times per week will truly be a massive benefit.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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“We’ll let the dice decide.”

I actually heard this while watching someone play D&D.

The little imp had quite the maniacal grin on his face, clearly he was a rather brutal dungeon master.

You might be asking how this applied to making gains.

Especially as people who tend to play D&D are not the most physically active of people.

Well it is if you just don’t want to delve in to the depths of fitness to learn how to effectively program your own training.

Same goes if you don’t want to hire a coach/trainer.

I have something for you that is endless in its possibilities and easy to apply, like right now.

You will pick one movement from this list:

– Push (includes crawling)
– Pull (includes climbing)
– Squat (includes all lunge/single leg patterns)
– Hinge (Includes all sling leg varieties)

You will also do a stint of loaded carries, if doesn’t matter what variation you do, it will last for up to 20min (or perhaps more) depending how much time you have left after the deice have decided your rep/set fat.

Now go grab a pair of dice.

Roll them, whatever they land on will be your reps per set for the day (2-12).

Roll them again, this time you get how many sets you’re doing for the day (2-12).

Set a training timer for 45min, that is how long you have to finish your sets/reps, once you get them all done you will fill the rest of your time with loaded carries and perhaps the optional plank.

You can train 2-7 days per week with this method.

Simply alternate the lifts you do and use a different movement base each session, or don’t, that’s your call after all, who am I to stop you skipping leg day, again.

Here is what something might look like:

Day 1:
A1 – Squat 12×12 – you poor bastard
B2 – Famers walks, if you have time that is.

Day 2:
A1 – Press 2×2 – DO NOT roll again! Worship the die and their judgement, clearly they know you’re done too much bench in your time and skipped too many leg days.
B2 – Sandbag Carry because you’ve got plenty of time.

Day 3 –
A1 – Weight Chin Up 9×5 – I’m okay with this.
B1 – Sled Drag for the remainder

Day 4 –
A1 – Snatch Grip DL – 7×3 – Huh, neat.
B2 – Prowler Push until your time is up

Day 5 – Off

Repeat the above with different movements and carry options.

Respect the die, they will give you all the set/rep variety you need.

In regards to loading you can either us the same loads each set or change them, dealers choice.

No go, enjoy.
Ross

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The KGB Method – Part 3

Putting it all together.
 
In parts 1 we looked loosely at how they days panned out.
 
Then through part 2 how you rotate the focus (daily or in a block of 3).
 
Below will be a brief example protocol you could potentially follow, however the main concept of this is to take away the idea of training different elements on different days.
 
The cycling or the movements and general focus of the training.
 
Finally it’s learning that just because you go to a gym or train that doesn’t mean you need to do body building style movements only.
 
^^ A trap many fall in to.
 
Okay, here we go.
 
– 3 on 1 off rotation
– Loading = go by feel or RM (rep max)
– Always leave 1-2 reps or something in the tank
– 2 lifts per session
– 20-45min per session (vary this each day)
– Rest as needed
 
Micro 1:
Day 1: Kettlebell – Fast
Day 2: Grappling – Slow
Day 3: Bodyweight – Flow
 
Micro 2:
Day 1: Kettlebell – Slow
Day 2: Grappling – Flow
Day 3: Bodyweight – Fast
 
Micro 3:
Day 1: Kettlebell – Flow
Day 2: Grappling – Fast
Day 3: Bodyweight – Slow
 
************************
 
Micro 1: 20-40min Sessions
 
Day 1: Kettlebell – Fast
 
A1 – Kettlebell Swing x 5-35 reps per set (p/s)
A2 – Kettlebell Shot-put x1-3 per arm (p/a)
 
 
Day 2: Grappling – Slow
 
A1 – Barbell Farmers Walk x20m, one bar each hand
A2 – Rope Climb* x1
 
*If no rope climb possible find something to climb 😂
 
Day 3: Bodyweight – Flow
 
A1 – Spiderman Crawl x20m
A2 – Inchworm/Down Dog x20m
 
Note down all the sets/reps you achieve, along with the loads used, remember though, you don’t need to keep the load the same each set, just saying.
 
************************
 
Micro 2: 20-40min Sessions
 
Day 1: Kettlebell – Slow
 
A1 – TGU x1 (p/a)
A2 – Renegade Row x 3-5 (p/a)
 
Day 2: Grappling – Flow
 
A1 – Sand Bag Lunge Shoulder Carry x 100m (p/a)
 
Day 3: Bodyweight – Fast
 
A1 – Plyo Push Up x3-5
A2 – CMJ x2 + Bound Jump x3
 
************************
 
Micro 3: 20-40min Sessions
 
Day 1: Kettlebell – Flow
 
A1 – Long Cycle x3min blocks
 
Day 2: Grappling – Fast
 
A1 – Sled Push x20m
A2 – Arm Over Arm Pull x20m
 
^^ Push the sled out 20m, walk back, sit down pull it back to you.
 
Day 3: Bodyweight – Slow
 
A1 – Single Arm Push Up x3-5
A2 – Pistol Squat x3-5
 
^^ Pause at the bottom of each rep
 
Repeat the above for one or two more rotations before changing exercises/movements
 
The above lasts for a total of 12 days, giving you 36 days for a full 3x repeat of it, of 24 if you do it twice, the aim would be to do a little more than you did the previous time.
 
That plays on the principle of Density (work done per unit of time), I’ve written about those before, just do a search on here via the tab and you’ll find more detail on it.
 
************************
 
As you can see the concept is simple, the training varied and you can be assured that the results will be plentiful.
 
Now you have the basic skeleton you can take it away with you and start to apply it.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Addicted to Exhaustion

Do you love volume? 
 
Smashing yourself in to a sweaty heap of mulch?
 
I do, truly I do.
 
My body however, well it no longer tolerates what it once did.
 
These days I could tell you exactly what will happen if I ramp up the amount I’m doing.
 
Week 1 – Feels good
Week 2 – Feels better
Week 3 – Death Reheated
 
The drop off rate is alarming, and that isn’t at a high intensity either.
 
Ironically if I was to play with loads at 80%+ with 5-25reps daily I can sustain that for months and make progress.
 
GTG style also works very well.
 
^^ This would be on one or two movements per day.
 
A session may look like this:
 
A1 – Press x6x2-4
A2 – Carry x60 seconds
A3 – Pull x6x2-4
 
^^ 1-2min rest between each movement
 
Creep that up by a standard volume increase, say
 
Week 1 6×2-4
Week 2 7×2-4
Week 3 8×2-4
 
Then these days bad things would happen.
 
Funny how sometimes that which we truly enjoy doing just isn’t good for us.
 
That being said I’f I was to have a high volume session I’d have to look at training every 3-5days.
 
By high volume I mean like I used to train only a mere 5-6 years ago.
 
Trade offs, trade offs, trade offs.
 
It is a struggle to let go of something you became so accustomed to.
 
I’d be that guy who was a true work horse.
 
If something wasn’t progressing then I’d simply do more work, there was endless energy and nothing slowed me down.
 
*Life looks over – “Aha, do I have a surprise for you.”
 
We only have so much that we can give.
 
So why is it why always try and give more than that which we have?
 
We could be here all day discussing that.
 
Our attitude of – “I just need to do a little more’
 
It’s a foolish one, seriously, the only person ho cares how hard you work in the gym is you, all the people looking on in awe will forget you the second someone else catches their eye doing more than you.
 
If you view of yourself is similar to mine form thee days of old, please heed my words.
 
Don’t break yourself.
 
It’s just not worth it in the long run.
 
Unless you are a paid athlete, like a legitimate one, not an Instagram one, they don’t count.
 
Working yourself in to the ground isn’t worth it.
 
For us average folk we can make leaps and bounds training every 3-5 days with higher volume/intensity styles of training.
 
Now there are many ways to train, I’ve shared plenty.
 
Some of which I’ms are you’ve seen and thought – I like that, I will try it, for 3 weeks, then got bored as results didn’t come as fast as you felt you deserved and thus you reverted back to your comfort zone of what you always did.
 
“Foolishness Dante, foolishness.”
 
In fact I’m going to extend a withered hand.
 
All you need do is ask and I’d happily write you something to do of the next 6months for free.
 
Why?
 
Why not.
 
It would be something you’d question because it’d be very different from what you’re doing (I’m willing to bet).
 
The question is this though, would you be willing to give it an honest go for 6 months or would your addiction to more get the better of you?
 
I guess we’ll see.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Lift Ladies, Lift!

Strength Training for Ladies:
 
Lift the heavy thing + solid nutrition = all the gains.
 
That’s essentially it.
 
🤗🤗🤗
 
I suppose we could look at some details as well.
 
You know what, to me the fact that more women are lifting is a very good thing because of all the benefits it offers, however we need to look at a few things to maximise what can be gained.
 
In the beginning days you’ll find these two main differences between the sexes when it comes to training due to genetics.
 
*If you’ve found different please do share your experience.
 
Ladies tend to do better with a higher volume of total work and their RM loads are not that far apart.
 
Men on the other hand don’t handle quite as high a volume and their RM loads can be dramatically different.
 
We shall tackle the volume in a second, first the loads.
 
Example:
 
Lady – 5RM = 100kg, 1RM = 107kg
Gent – 5RM = 100kg, 1RM = 120kg
 
This has bene linked in with overall levels of neurological strength and MU firing rates, plus the initial difference in LBM when looking at beginners on both sides of the fence.
 
Of course as training starts to progress this gap lessens, however one thing that does seem consistent is that ladies handle more total volume far better than the gents do (faster recovery etc).
 
Strength itself is a skill.
 
You have to learn to express your strength, regardless of how much base strength you have, if someone knows how to get everything ‘just right’ they will surprise you with just how much iron they can shift.
 
The most optimal rep range for this is 1-5 reps.
 
In regards to optimal sets, that’s where things get interesting as in an ideal world it will be answered as such – how many you can handle with good form.
 
That might be 5 sets, it might be 50.
 
Who knows.
 
Many who follow the tome of hypertrophy will start to bang out statistics and ‘evidence’ or ‘studies’, which is all well and good, however strength is a different animal.
 
You want to lift a heavy load, as often as possible, while staying as fresh as you can.
 
When I’ve trained ladies in the past who wanted to get strong this seemed to work very well for beginners put o the intermediate level (as a general starting point).
 
2-4 reps x 10-30 sets x 3-10RM
 
The weight east set would change in some rather sharp and random ways.
 
Not what people expect, here is what is may have looked like if the reps were static (for simplicity).
 
2 x 7RM, 3RM, 5RM, 10RM, 3RM, 3RM, 9RM, 7RM, 5RM, 4RM, etc
 
^^ One or two movements (compound focus)
 
Throw in some conditioning work in the form of sprints, kettlebell snatches, complexes, PHA bits and pieces and you’ll soon find yourself or your female clients getting the results they’ve always wanted.
 
*I found many ladies enjoyed full body work and responded best to it for when they were after an overall aesthetic look and strength.
 
Here is an example session:
 
W/U – Mobility Flow (or KB complex flow)
Skill – 15sets of Bent Press practice 1-3 reps
Strength – 10-30 sets S/S Clean & Press + Chin 2-4 reps
Conditioning – L/C, Rope Climb Hold, Swings – 10Min
C/D – Mobility or Yoga Flow
 
A lot of volume, a lot of practice and varied loads each and every set.
 
Easy on paper, in practice no so much.
 
The aim of getting stronger is the goal of many.
 
One little gem of information for achieving it though is this; you leave a session feeling stronger than you did when you entered, like you could do more however you don’t.
 
Leaving something in the tank and feeling strong is key.
 
Doing the will allow you a higher frequency of training and that will yield results far faster then you could imagine, if you’re willing to leave a little in the tank every session.
 
Obviously there will be some days you push a little harder than others, however this shouldn’t be the status quo, despite what fitness rags tell you.
 
Apply the philosophy of ‘same yet different’ as well and you’ve got a very potent mix for progress.
 
*S-Y-D = Zercher Squat, Front Squat, Back Squat -they are all squats and while the same they’re still different.
 
Now go, become strong.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Delorme & Watkins 2.0 – Progressive Resistance Exercise, Reloaded 💪💪

*Explosions in the background, unicorns & rainbows too.
 
You’ve heard of this classic –
 
3 sets of 10 reps
 
– Set 1 10RM x50%
– Set 2 10RM x75%
– Set 3 10RM x100%
 
Make gains.
 
The original protocol was implemented to people of all sorts of situations, originally polio victims and the injured (usually ex-forces), plus omsk beginners to exercises.
 
Now before you throw the baby out with the bath water and say this isn’t for you because you’re beyond this level of training, know this one thing….
 
You’re not 🤗
 
That being said, here are a couple of ways you can apply this method to your current training if you feel that three sets just isn’t enough for you.
 
D&W Waves –
 
Establish your 10RM for a given lift (personally I’d take 90% of that load and check the ego as a true 10RM is brutal).
 
Perform the classic 3×10 x 50-75-100% 10RM.
 
Rest in-between each set as much as you feel you need.
 
Once you complete one wave do at least 2 more, starting each wave with the 50% load, then do the 75%, think of that as active recovery.
 
Three waves yields a hefty amount of volume, if you’re feeling up to it go for a 4th one, if that is too easy try a 5th.
 
5 waves will give you 150 total reps, that’s a lot of volume, it will be an even harder session if you super-set two movements.
 
Truly an epic session that would be.
 
D&W Ladders –
 
This is hard, seriously hard.
 
The reps are broken down in to one of the following options:
 
– 1,2,3,4
– 2,3,5
– 4,6
– Anything that adds up to 10
 
You can super-set or simply use the rest to add load to the bar for the next set.
 
Example: do 2 reps at 50%, load to 75% do two reps, laid to 100% do 2 reps, now repeat with 3 and 5.
 
This style of loading will allow you to actually utilise your true 10RM without the chance of any form breakdown.
 
You’ll find the above works well on larger movements.
 
D&W Super Squats –
 
I’m sure you’ve heard of this before.
 
You know the one, you load up your 10RM and do 20 reps with it.
 
Yea well that’s not going to happen and if it did then you didn’t use your true 10RM, sounds like common sense however many miss that point that an RM (repetition max) is exactly that, a max.
 
It means 100% effort to get all the reps with the load you have on the lift, with near perfect form and not one more rep could be gained.
 
To apply the Super Squat theory to D&W you’d need to make a load adjustment.
 
I’d say 80% of your 10RM is a good start.
 
Each session, or every other session you add 1 rep to each set.
 
Example: 2 sessions per week
 
Week 1 = 3x10x50-75-100%
Week 2 = 3x11x50-75-100%
Week 3 = 3x12x50-75-100%
Week 11 = 3x20x50-75-100%
 
Then you’ve got a choice, test your 10RM and see if there is any change and take 80% of that and repeat, or just add load and go back to 3×10.
 
All of the above are classics methods, hover when you blend some together great things happen.
 
Personally I’d advise going for super sets, two lifts per session.
 
Cover the following:
 
– Push
– Hinge
– Pull
– Squat
– Carry*
– Full Body*
 
*Optional, however if you don’t do these as main lifts then having them as accessory will be a good thing.
 
Here is an example training template you could follow and make epic gains with.
 
2 Training Days p/w
 
Day 1:
A1 – TGU 10×1
B1 – Front Squat (or squat variant) D&W – Ladder
B2 – Pull Up (or pulling variant) D&W – Ladder
C1 -Towel Curl Carry at Half Rep Position 20-40m
C2 – Hill Sprint 200m – AMRAP 10-15min
 
Day 2:
A1 – Sandbag Clean & Carry – 20m Repeats x15min
B1 – Stiff Leg DL (or DL variant) D&W – Waves
B2 – Dip (or pushing variant) D&W – Waves
C1 – Overhead Press & Waiter Walk 20m AMRAP 10min
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Always an alternative

Sadly squats were not on the cards today.
 
Well, at least not with a bar.
 
The adaptation was simple, yet sinister.
 
100 total reps of Pistols.
 
This was 50 per leg with half being working sets of 32kg (5×5) and recovery sets at 50% of that (5x5x16kg).
 
In-between each set of pistols was a set of swings with 32kg hitting 15-35 reps per set.
 
Seems easy on paper, in reality not so much.
 
You are never short of the ability to train if you’re honest with yourself.
 
Of course if you feel like a rest day or are jammed working/traveling, cool to skip a day, however just skipping the gym because of being lazy isn’t a good path to go down.
 
One way to get around the dogmatic view of –
 
“I can’t get to the gym to do XYZ exercise.”
 
Think about movement patterns: Push, Pull, Squat, Hinge, Locomotion (loaded carry) or Movement (crawling, climbing etc) at the simple level, hitting one or tow of those daily will be life changing for most people.
 
We have gotten stuck in the gym mindset.
 
Meaning we can only get the results we want when we go to the gym, this isn’t true.
 
Now if you are to say that one can only get specific results desired from training in a gym (or with specialist kit) then that is a different topic with a valid point and requires more discussion.
 
If the goal is simply to feel better, move better, look better and stave off the cold hand of the reaper a little longer, then there is no inherent need for a gym or specialist kit, not really.
 
Don’t get me wrong, specialist kit is great and makes training good fun and easier to adhere to.
 
Not to mention of the tools are there then they should be utilised because that is what tools are for.
 
What do you do when your normal routine is compromised?
 
I look forwards to reading your answers below.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Reps for days

It isn’t uncommon for people to ask – “What sets/reps should I be doing?”

While perhaps not that exactly, it will be something along those lines, as such I’ve found that cycling them based on a classic Heavy-Light-Medium rotation applied to a Pull-Push-Legs split.

One element to remember is that Heavy doesn’t mean hard and light doesn’t mean easy, however that is a topic for another day, for now I will give you something you can apply immediately.

Rep/Set Schemes:

  • Heavy  – 5-3-2-5-3-2-5-3-2 (heavy yet not hard)
  • Light – 20-15-10-20-15-10 (light yet not easy)
  • Medium – 5-8×1 + 1×20 – ramp to heavy single for the day, then take 60-70% of that and do one set of 20 reps

Split Options: 4 day split examples

  • Pull-Push-Legs-Off-Repeat
  • Lower-Upper-Posterior-Off-Repeat
  • Strength-Conditioning-Mobility(restorative)-Off-Repeat

^^ 2-4 lifts per day is often sufficient, 1 main with the rep/set scheme, the rest can be 2-3×10-15 or 4×6, your choice.

If we take the PPL and apply the rep schemes over a small cycle.

No change in lifts, only reps.

Day 1 – Pull – Heavy
Day 2 – Push – Light
Day 3 – Legs – Medium
Day 4 – Off
Day 5 – Pull – Light
Day 6 – Push – Medium
Day 7 – Legs – Heavy
Day 8 – Off
Day 9 – Pull – Medium
Day 10 – Push – Heavy
Day 11 – Legs – Light
Day 12 – Off

Many will then say – “What now?”

Once you’ve gone through this you’ll find you’re back at the heavy day being for pull, you can choose to keep the lifts the same and try to hit a higher load or you can perhaps change the lifts, pick your poison.

This allows for a constant rotation of days and keeps things interesting, if you are constrained be the working week and days you can train then you may need something a little different, in which case all you need do it ask for the answer.

Enjoy,
Ross

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