Tag Archives: progress

The age old question

Them – “What is better, volume or load?”
 
Me – “The answer is yes.”
 
*face palm.
 
You’ll find these sorts of questions are common.
 
How to answer them without being didactic is where things become tricky because without more context any answer is right, or wrong, or irrelevant.
 
In reference to the above it was surrounding body composition, fat loss specifically.
 
The short answer for that is volume, however…
 
Volume with/that induces sufficient mechanical tension.
 
You see mechanical tension is the driving factor behind MUR (motor unit recruitment) and this is the important factor and why the answer from above is yes.
 
When it comes to high threshold motor unit recruitment (HTMUR), you can achieve this via heavy loading – 85% 1RM+ or by causing extreme fatigue in the type 1 muscle fibres and 2a’s in which they draw upon the deeper fibres/units to help them keep going.
 
From a hypertrophy standpoint volume and going to that point of fatigue and HTMUR with moderate loads is king, and while you’ll build strength that type of strength won’t be on the same level as that built with heavier loads to elicit the same response.
 
The heavier loads however will often have less hypertrophy due to the high demands on the CNS and not being able to hit potential volume requirements to trigger maximal hypertrophy.
 
It’s why there is no one answer or protocol that does it all.
 
When you look back at successful lifters and their training you’ll find the coaches alternated periods of loading, volume, and everything in-between to continually elicit HTMUR so that a continued adaptive response would be the result, hopefully.
 
The other benefit of alternating between all of the above is so from building muscle, to learning how to express the strength potential of said new muscle and then performing in comp.
 
Basically you need to have working sets in your training (be those volume or load/intensity based) that force you to go beyond where you currently are.
 
You see working to your current limits won’t take you to the place in which you’ll discover new ones.
 
A lot of people forget this.
 
It’s one of the main reasons a large amount stall and fail to make any further progress in training, and even life, at which pint they make up various excuses about being happy, maintaining and other such nonsense when in reality they’re just being soft and aren’t willing to truly push for more.
 
I know I said there is no best of both, and there isn’t even though there kind of is, ish.
 
From a recommendation standpoint I’d suggest the following for a blend of the two above –
 
(They will work for everyone, that even means you unique snowflakes out there)
 
– Ramp to a heavy 2,3 or 5 rep set (muscle potentiation)
– Back off sets = true working sets
– 6-20 reps per set
– 2-3 TRUE working sets (0-2 reps in reserve)
– An average loss of 1-2 reps of 2.5-5% loading per set indicate correct loading/effort in previous set
 
*If you feel the need for extra volume or prefer a simpler approach then take 60-80% of your top set for the day and do 50-100 reps in as few sets as possible.
 
Both the above, provided you lift with intent, will hit that much desired HTMUR.
 
Focus on doing better instead of simply doing more.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Your Excuse, Your Failure

“It gets harder as you get older.”
 
Well yes, but actually no.
 
This is something I’ve heard no less than a dozen times since January the 1st, and from people in their 30’s.
 
Okay, your 30, not dead and the reason you’ve gained fat, lost muscle and feel shit about yourself is because you allowed it to happen because life got comfortable.
 
Yep, it’s all on you, the universe or other cosmic entity just went with the choices you decide to make.
 
Age, like having kids or some phantom/elf diagnosed medical condition, is the perfect excuse for people to hide behind because to question it will have you almost burned at the steak.
 
In full candour, life it simply hard there are very few breaks given and the struggle is real.
 
In this knowledge you have two real choices:
 
1 – Do the best you can with what you’ve been given
2 – Hide behind excuses like everyone else
 
There isn’t much more to it really.
 
Yes barriers, unfortunate events and general shit will crop up, that is inevitable however it’s how you choose to deal with it that counts.
 
Excuse or effort, it’s your call.
 
Don’t get me wrong, I’m far from free of the above because so many excuses have come from my lips, so well thought out that I almost even convinced myself of their validity and who they truly stopped me moving forwards.
 
This of course was all bullshit, they were just excuses that gave me a reason to give up and not feel too bad about it when the truth of the matter was so much simpler.
 
It wasn’t important enough to me.
 
That is literally what it comes down to, and in addition to that I learned from a very young age that telling people this, that things or they didn’t matter went down like a lead ballon. So I started making excuses that would protect everyone and give me an out.
 
All bullshit really and as I got older and less worried about the world and the people in it I found my attitude evolved into what it is now –
 
‘I will tell you the truth regardless, you can choose to response or react because I’m done.’
 
Excuses come in may shapes and sizes, as do our legitimate barriers/obstacles.
 
There is one crucial difference between them though, a barrier/obstacle will have options to overcome it and still slow you to move forwards, even if slowly, essentially they simply slow you down and will eventually no longer be an issue/consideration.
 
An excuse on the other hand will be there forever because you’re allowing it to be there because you’ve created it and to remove it will involve you being 100% honest with yourself in the fact that you put it there to sabotage yourself and give you a reason to fail, quite, give up and stay weak or helpless.
 
Excuse or effort, your choice.
 
If it really means something to you then you’ll find a way, like life.
 
Life will always find a way to keep growing, you should too.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Arbitrary Goals for 2020

Lacking direction for gym related targets?
 
Here are some to consider hitting if you’d like the fleeting respect of people you’ll never see again mias social media.
 
Barbell Curl 0.50xBW x20reps
Press – 0.75xBW x20reps
Pull Up – Bw x20reps
Bench Press – BW x20reps
Squat – 1.5xBW x20reps
Deadlift – 2xBW x20reps
 
Why 20?
 
Why are barbell curls in there, surely there are better movements to do?
 
My answer is as follows:
 
Because why not 😂
 
These are simply arbitrary goals that will yield a decent benefit to many people.
 
The loads are not astronomical, in fact all of the above are pretty reasonable unless you’re very weak.
 
If you are very weak then they’re the ideal goals for you because they will rid you of said weakness.
 
How you program to achieve these is up to you.
 
My suggestion is to train 3 days per week with a different focus lift on each day.
 
Monday – Day 1 – Deadlift & Curl
Wednesday – Day 2 – Bench Press & Pull Up
Saturday – Day 3 – Press & Squat
 
Being able to hit all the above for 1 solid set of 20 will be quite satisfying, if you wish to extend this goal for a little more bang for your buck try to achieve 2 working sets of 20 at the target weights.
 
When you can do that you’ll have built a good foundation of strength and potentially muscle as well (provided your nutrition supports it).
 
For accessory work pick 2-3 movements for your posterior chain, things like Loaded Carries, Reverse Hypers, Good Mornings, Reverse Flies & Tricep/Calf/Grip work are all good, 2-3×10-15 for these work well.
 
For the 20rep goal, establish the end goal loads.
 
Once you know these you work backwards to sensible starting weights (perhaps 50% of the end weight).
 
Here is an example based on my on BW rounded up for easy maths:
 
Barbell Curl 0.50xBW = 40kg /2 = 20kg start
Press – 0.75xBW x20reps = 60kg /2 = 30kg start
Pull Up – Bw x20reps = 80kg* /2 = 40kg
Bench Press – BW x20reps 80kg /2 = 40kg start
Squat – 1.5xBW x20reps 120kg /2 = 60kg start
Deadlift – 2xBW x20reps 160kg /2 = 80kg start
 
*For the pull up you’d use band if required, or personally I’d just start off doing lower reps and building on them until I hit 20 unbroken.
 
All decent starting loads that are very achievable.
 
Warm up set wise you won’t need much, perhaps 1-2×20, then crack on with the work.
 
For the working sets you’ll be having that set to 1 for the time being, aim to add load each session you successfully hit 20reps in your woking set.
 
E.G – Press – 0.75xBW x20reps = 60kg /2 = 30kg start
30kg x20 = +2.5kg
32.5 x20= +3.5kg
35kg x13 = stay at this load and aim to get 1-2 more reps and repeat until you hit 20.
 
Make sense?
 
Once you hit the end weight goals add in a second working set at that weight, if you hit the reps first try then it’s time to set a new goal, if not work on that until you hit 2×20 – working sets.
 
May your 2020 be filled with progress & success.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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WTH?

Well, shit 😂😂😂
 
Yesterday was down to be an H-Day training wise for me.
 
^^ This meant pushing the numbers to see how close to the target I was.
 
The initial H-Day was done 8 sessions ago.
 
I hit 54 reps out of 75 with a pair of 32kg bells in the KB double rack squat.
 
While nothing Earth shattering in regards to loading, it was the best option now the injuries (accidental) were healed, plus not being near a gym it made logical sense.
 
Off of the 54 reps there were L/M-Days programmed:
 
L-Day: 21 total reps with 2x32kg bells (40% of H-Day reps)
M-Day: 36 total reps with 2x32kg bells (70% of H-Day reps)
 
^^ I alternated these session to session, with either ladders of 1-2-3-4-5-6, 3-4×3 and 1-2-3 for the L-Day and each medium day ended up being 2-4-6×3.
 
These were done every 3 days.
 
So not really pushing the envelope too much, just getting in volume slowly and focusing on the tension, speed and form of each set/reps.
 
Yesterday came the ladder test which had the goal of 5×1-2-3-4-5.
 
I choose to super-set this with pull ups just because.
 
In 44min all 75reps had been done with minimal rest, no from breakdown, in fact as I became deeper into the sets/reps the form got better, stronger and kept increasing in RFD.
 
A classic WTH (what the hell) effect.
 
it’s funny how little we can do and really make good progress.
 
Now that target has been hit there is a choice to be made.
 
Take up my own challenge of the ‘5 a Day’ or go for another block of the above with 2x40kg bells.
 
Since I’ve not done any bar work I may opt for the ‘5 a day’ then once that is done go back to the KBs, after all there is no rush.
 
How often do you get a WTH-effect in your training?
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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I Renounce You

“Intent, that’s the key. Pouring your soul fully into your endeavour.
 
Greatness is there to be taken not by who’s strongest but by who’s left.
 
You see you don’t need to be born great to survive, you just need to survive to become great in the end.” – Unknown
 
How long have you been training now?
 
All in all my end it’s been over 20years.
 
20 years… Man, that’s a long time.
 
Looking back at all the skills that’ve been gained, lost, mastered and even forgotten, it’s quite something.
 
Lifting have been a staple for 15years, the goals changing from that of endurance based work for better sustained strength in a fight, to bone crushing raw strength for the platform and a single rep.
 
All the training has had a place, all has had it’s flaws or rather it’s exposed my flaws many times over.
 
There have been times of great progress and more of lacklustre lulls.
 
One lesson that has been learned through great resistance is that you must give away that which you desire willingly, then move forwards and you’ll find eventually that which you gave away comes back when the time is ready and you reap the rewards of that sacrifice tenfold.
 
We try so hard for so long.
 
Eventually we let go of our ego and resign ourselves to whatever may happen and in that moment we finally learn how to learn.
 
Often the process isn’t pleasant, it isn’t enjoyable and we don’t love it as people claim. In fact we hate it so passionately we can’t live without it.
 
We refuse it’s gift as long as we can.
 
Eventually though we become ready to let it teach, guide and carry us down the river to the place we need to be, and while that might not be the pace we’d like to be, it’s often the one that is most necessary for us to grow.
 
To break through your limits you must first acknowledge them.
 
None of this ‘anything is possible bullshit’.
 
Somethings are not meant for us until we accept this truth, we may only be able to achieve second tier heights in some areas that is just life, yet it’s not about trying to master everything.
 
It’s about knowing that which you can master.
 
While it might not be what you think, want or would like to be the arbiter of, it will be the one thing you truly master and command with complete serenity and no one else will ever come close.
 
You have to be willing to give yourself to the void.
 
Musashi Miyamoto knew this, that’s why he called it –
 
‘The Way’
 
When you’re ready to relinquish all to the above, you might just find it too.
 
Ross

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The Flaw Behind an Old Saying

Chances are you’ve heard this before:
 
“If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always got.”
 
This isn’t actually true, well, not in regards to fitness.
 
In that realm if you do what you’ve always done you’ll get less each time you do it.
 
This is due to the law of accommodation.
 
Your body will get better at doing its specified task, using less energy over time as it becomes more efficient, then less muscle will be needed and eventually that will atrophy. Once that happens TDEE goes down, if there is then no adjustment in calories you’ll be in a surplus and that will eventually lead to fat gain.
 
The most difficult part is that people don’t want to give away what they are currently doing.
 
They have an emotional attachment to it you see.
 
Even if it serves no purpose anymore, they cling to it needlessly, even at the cost of progress.
 
Chances are you’re aware that the body needs to be constantly put under enough of a stimulus to warrant adaptation.
 
This is where you need to apply the ‘same yet different principle in to your training via volume, intensity, density (work capacity) or novelty.
 
The stimulus in question though needs to be large enough to actually warrant change otherwise you will fall prey to what is known as ‘transient accumulation process’ – this basically means that changes too small, too frequent or too random don’t allow the body enough time to catch on and adapt to, so it doesn’t.
 
Many fall into this trap, you can tell by looking at them and their overall level of muscularity, strength, conditioning and performance.
 
Harsh yet true for a large amount of the population, sadly.
 
– Beginners need change the least, every 12 weeks works well
– Intermediates around every 6-8 weeks will do
– Advanced it’s between 3-6 weeks
– Elite, well they do what ever they choose to do because they’re Elite
 
When was the last time you changed up your training enough to allow a positive yet empt stimulus that caused you to progress?
 
In fact when was the last time you made any progress at all?
 
Give the above some thought and if you’ve not really made any real, honest and tangible progress then leave a comment below and we shall see what tweaks/suggestions we can come up with to help you overcome that road block.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Productive or Destructive?

Chances are you’re aware of the evolution of how many training days I will now suggest most people do per week.
 
2-4 works well for many, with 3 splitting the difference 😂
 
While it is true that this attitude comes from years of making mistakes and doing too much it is not without some aspects of the past.
 
You see training less, or doing less better doesn’t mean pissing about.
 
Your sessions still want to be worth your time.
 
This will mean putting in a decent amount of intensity/effort each time you step foot in the gym, that doesn’t mean killing yourself for the sake of it.
 
There is a big difference between intense training that is productive and and intense one that is destructive.
 
Which would you rather – Productive or Destructive?
 
Many think that the training they do is the former when in reality it’s the latter and because of this they struggle to make progress.
 
When you delve into the training literature you’ll find that volume & intensity are not as inversely related as you might think.
 
True enough you still need to wave the loading and play with the volume* levels however many can work far harder than they realise and the result of not doing so is progress/gains being left on the gym floor.
 
*A volume reduction every third or fifth session by 40-60% is a good way to not burn out, intensity can be kept in the 70-85% 1RM range by doing this.
 
**If you venture in to the 90%+ realms you will last about three weeks as this level, then you may need to back off for 6-9weeks before going back to this height again.
 
Many are becoming more aware of this though.
 
The introduction of ‘Effective Reps’ lately has helped many.
 
You will find the common theme is that you need to have 15-35 effective reps per movement to make progress.
 
Say you do 5 sets of 5 with 90% of your 5RM, fresh yo will find the first 2 sets of 5 may have no real effective reps due to the muscle recruitment needed, set 3 you might get 2, then 3 on set 4 and perhaps 4 on set 5, yielding 9 total effective reps.
 
This is not new information.
 
I remember writing about this back in 2010 (the muscle fibre recruitment side of things and how more sets lead to greater fatigue and thus great muscular recruitment), I shall try and dig it up.
 
You see often 5×5 isn’t 5×5, it’s actually 2×5.
 
The first three sets while they are ‘working sets’ they’re not ‘WORKING SETS’ due to the bodies neurological firing/ramping processes.
 
It is at times like these where knowing how the numbers work can make all the difference.
 
Here is a short version that you can apply literally today:
 
– Lifting sub max RM loads you’d do well to add 2-3 extra sets (7×5 instead of 5×5)
 
– Using 100% RM loads you’d do well to do 2-3reps less than the RM load (sets of 8 with 10RM load)
 
– TUL is important, you want to create as much tension from rep 1 as possible and aim to keep this throughout the entire set (or ideally generate more tension if possible)
 
A nifty way to apply this in training without needing to know the numbers though is as follows – Ramping.
 
Ramping:
 
– Pick a rep range (6)
– Do sets of 6 adding weight until you hit the 6RM for the day.
 
Next Options:
 
– Drop down 10% and rep sets of 6 until you lose a rep, then drop another 5% and repeat.
 
Looks like this – 6RM = 100kg, -10% to 90kg 6,6,6,6,5, -5% to 85kg 6,6,6,4 – finished for the day on lift movement.
 
Alternatively:
– Hit the top 6, rest 5min and repeat the same load, do this as many times as possible with good form.
 
Looks like this – 6RM = 100kg, rest 6, rest 6, rest, 6 rest, 4 now done for the day.
 
Finally:
– Hit the top 6, drop 20% off the load and re-ramp, repeat this from the original 20% drop until speed/tension/form can no longer be maintained.
 
Looks like this – 6RM = 100kg, -20%, 80kg re-ramp>97kg, -20%, 80kg re-ramp>90kg, -20% 80kg re-ramp>85kg – a good place to stop for the day.
 
While simple they are effective ways of getting in more quality work.
 
Remember that you don’t need to spend hours training.
 
You do however how to train with intent, otherwise you’re merely there for the sake of being there and while people may say that you doing something is better than nothing I can tell you without any hesitation it’s not.
 
Something isn’t better than nothing.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Gym Free

Soon I am to be without a gym.
 
The place I currently train is set to close, it has had a good run however as with all good things it must come to an end.
 
A few good memories have been had at this simple place.
 
You’d find the beauty of this particular gym in the fact it had very little kit and very limited weight (200kg ish in plates, total), a pull up bar, TRX, small section of dumbbells (2-20kg) and 2 DAP cable machine.
 
Honestly it made for some of the most productive training I’ve had in years.
 
It also helped break my addictive mindset.
 
Personally I enjoy doing 3 movements per training session.
 
This seems to be the right amount of work that allows a solid focus with ample variety while also cutting out any chance of bullshit and exercise fodder.
 
Junk volume became a thing of the past.
 
Typically sessions were about 45-60min, if time was short only the main movement would be done, thus resulting in a one lift training session.
 
The other two lifts tended to be accessory, unless I felt like doing something more taxing.
 
My most favoured one lift sessions:
 
Deadlifts
Squats
Presses
Rows
Pull/Chin Ups
 
When the main lift didn’t feel like it was enough some ultra basic superset tactics would be utilised:
 
Front Squat & Straight Leg DL
Sumo DL & Floor Press
Press & Pull Up
 
The typical session would look like this:
 
100x Rows (bodyweight, bar or DB)
Main lift – 45min of S/B/DL/P
100x Reverse Flies*
 
*Alternated session to session with tricep work
 
Yep, back would be done first and last, mainly for postural purposes and some feeling of the posterior chain.
 
I’m also not adverse to doing a few hundred kettlebell swings in a day (or perhaps 100 snatches) just because I feel like it, the posterior chain is king and needs to be treated as such.
 
It’s not much, at least it’s honest though.
 
You’ve now had an insight into the training I do.
 
There is less emotional attachment to specific movements these days, for that I’m thankful.
 
Training is just training at the end of the day.
 
If you don’t squat for 6 months no one is going to care, not really. That doesn’t mean you won’t train your legs in some way shape of from, it just means you wont necessarily do it by squatting.
 
Oh yes, you don’t need to train in the classic body building or Frankenstein method (by body part).
 
You can choose to train the way you desire.
 
There are not training police. No underground triad that will cut off the tip of your little finger for not training like a body builder (they only do that if you dishonour/fail them, phew).
 
You may be aware my philosophy of training evolved.
 
It was once about doing it all,now it’s about simply doing better.
 
Get really really good at something, or a few things, take them to their limit then be happy and give them a break and do something entirely different.
 
You know when it’s time to give something away (movement/exercise wise) when you start to get emotionally attached to it.
 
Ideally you give it away before this happens.
 
One way to hep you do this is to find a gym that has very little to offer in the way of kit because in that you’ll find it’s true gift, freedom.
 
Remember this the next time you’re presented a choice.
 
Instead of choosing fashion (creature comforts, shiny kit and all the trimmings).
 
Choose freedom.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Giving to Yourself

Amateur athletes, weekend warriors & those who train hard.

Give yourself the gift or more time.

Give yourself the gift or more rest.

Honestly, you’ve got plenty of time to make progress, even if you’re in your 60’s you can still move forwards.

Too many rush and injury is their reward.

This doesn’t mean you will become slothful or lacklustre in your training, oh no.

You will still be required to lift with intent, focus and gusto.

The only difference is that you allow yourself a little more rest between sets, perhaps an extra day off here and there all to allow you more recovery which will translate in to more progress in the end.

You see for the majority of us training is suppose to enhance our lives, not absorb or detract from them.

In my years of training I’ve been obsessive, too rigid, unwavering in adherence to the routine and while it did indeed yield results, would it really have been so bad if I arrive at that point perhaps 2-3 years later?

My prize was glory when the flame burned bright.

Even for a short while I was untouchable, then it all fell to pieces and burnout was my enteral reward.

This took almost as many years to recover from.

Yep. 5 years of the true iron path ended up in 5 years to recover from it, and the kicker is I wasn’t even anything worth shout about in the grand scheme of things.

While we talk about enjoy the journey, which I did, I can tell you it wasn’t worth it, breaking yourself for ego is never worth it, yet many will do this because it’s the message of the world.

Work hard and what you seek shall be yours, oh and it will, you just wont be able to hold on to it for very long.

Sensible training, reasonable & repeatable sessions, more recovery days and optimal nutrition choices, that is what will yield the best long term results.

True you may decide to test/peak/push yourself perhaps once of twice per year, and in truth that’s all you need.

Anything more is superfluous.

As I sit here typing this I do wonder, will you listen to me?

Will these words of warning resonate or run off like water from a ducks back because like a far younger me you still think you currently know better.

The truth is we never know better, we only know what we know, or what we choose to believe and that’s rarely whats best for us.

Anyway, here are 7 suggestions for you, garnered from years grinding away for little reward.

1 – Nutrition trumps training
2 – Consistency is key, so train reasonably & repeatably
3 – Train every 3-5 days
4 – Take 5min rest after heavy sets, maybe even up to 10
5 – Test yourself once or twice per year
6 – Set mini goals that require some effort, not all your effort
7 – Have a greater purpose behind you for training, training for the sake of training rarely ends well

Enjoy,
Ross

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Frustrations

While chatting to a client last night the goal was to listen o their frustrations. 

The didn’t feel for the effort they put in (to all aspects of their life) that they were getting their just desserts.

“My training is consistent.”

“My nutrition has been varied and clarions tracked.”

“My work has improved in both productivity and efficiency.”

“My life couldn’t be at a better point, and yet I’m not where I want to be, it’s so frustrating! I just start to think things will never change and just don’t know what the point is in keeping it all up.”

“I know things take time, I just want some hint it’s going to be worth it.”

A truly heartfelt frustration.

Often the effort we put into a great many things doesn’t yield the results we’d perhaps desire.

While this might not be fair it just is what it is. 

I have friends who dislike that quote ‘it is what is is’, potentially because of it being the attitude of people who have become resigned to the deterministic philosophy due to their life experience in always knocking them down or the undeserving getting that which they feel should have been theirs. 

It’s an understandable annoyance, yet these are also the same people that won’t outwardly express what is it hey want, or vocalise what is perhaps needed to be said to the right people,  they often just sit and wait in the hope that they will get recognised just because they feel they should. 

Sadly in this life if you want something you have to not only want it, work for it, or go for it, you must also make it known you want it by asking for it. 

Fortune favours the bold or brave (depending now his quote you prefer). 

It’s quite true. You’d be surprised what you can actually get simply by asking for it. 

Anyway, back to the frustrated client above. 

I was quite honest in telling them I didn’t know why they where not where they wanted to be or showered with glories praise, from an emotional standpoint that is. 

From a training/empirical standpoint it’s been 3 weeks into their current training after they spent 5months being inconsistent and basically pissing about and making poor choices. 

Yes I did tell them that directly because pandering isn’t what they needed and the simple truth is that you won’t often see much change in 3weeks, maybe 3 months or 3 years, however not 3 weeks. If you had dramatic change in such a short space of time, like say losing 2 stone I’d advise you go to the the doctor as you may have a terminal illness, yet this is the result people feel they deserve.

This was what prompted me to re-ask “What result/expectations do you feel you should have by now and why?, No, really, why? Why do you have the expectations you do?”.

Now for something a little bigger to consider, especially if you’ve felt/feel this way…..

Why out of all the people on this planet do you feel your the only one with these frustrations?

Why are you so special that the process should be different or miraculous?

Is it because you know someone who knows someone or you say it on social media?

Very few things in this life happen by accident. They are often an accumulation of minor, or major choices we’ve made or didn’t make and eventually they all come to fruition and result in X, Y or Z,which may or may not be your desired outcome.

As with any endeavour, even those that are truly frustrating, you must just accept that they will take time and perhaps be a tad more realistic with your expectations.

Frustration affects us all, yet like a lot of things they’re fleeting and not worth dwelling on.

Take a look around you, see that most other people are in the same boat and enjoy the journey because it’s rarely the destination that makes it worth while, it’s often the experiences you pick up along the way. 

Enjoy, 

Ross

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