Tag Archives: programming

💪A novel take on Gironde’s 8×8💪

Over in the Gains Central group I shared a post yesterday regarding the much coveted 8×8 method.
 
Beginner – 8x8x60-70% 8RM
Advanced – 8x8x80-95% 8RM
 
In the reps/sets above you get only 30 seconds rest between them, you’d also do 3-4 movements per muscle group and 2-3 muscle groups per sessions.
 
Truly a high density program.
 
One worth investing a good 3-4months of training into, so long as you stick to it.
 
Now while you will get a lot of volume, of most people they will not stay on it long enough to progress and get strong from it.
 
Over the years you’ll find this works well on muscles that are more suited to being under constant tension.
 
– Quads
– Calves
– Lats
– Biceps
– Pecs
 
You’ll notice this is mostly anterior chain dominant.
 
While you can bring in hamstrings and other various posterior chain movements/lifts, it’s often a struggle for many and they just don’t get the stimulus needed.
 
That being said, if you did some heavy deadlifts for say 6×4, follow by stiff legs at 4×6 and then did some metabolite production work at the end in the form of Gironde’s 8×8 on 1-3 hamstring isolation variations, well now we’re talking 💪
 
From experience this is where the 8×8 method truly shines.
 
Building a high work capacity is equally as important as training being simply high in density.
 
This happens when you get stronger and lift heavier loads, essentially.
 
Using it in the accessory/isolation movements yields quite the favourable result, while compound movements such as squats also work well, they are incredibly fatiguing both mentally and physically.
 
Remember one of the main aims in training is to elicit and positive adpative stimulus, not just rep ourselves to death.
 
As such here is a novel approach you can utilise in combination with the above.
 
Main Lift – 5-5-3-3-2-2-2, 3-5min rest
Secondary lift – 6×6, 2-3min rest
Accessory Lift (s) – 8×8 (as above)
 
Enjoy,
Ross
 
***You can use the concept of the 30seconds rest with many other rep ranges too, such as 5×5, 6×6, 8×4, 6×4, etc.
 
The premise is a high amount of work (volume) in a short amount of time (density), just be sure that you aim at progressing the loads (intensity) to build up your overall work capacity (the ability to repeat high quality efforts).

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Playing with Time

After writing a small piece on Gains Central the idea of ‘Timed Sets’ got touched on.
 
Given these are great little tools for giving people a variable shock and devotion from the norm they’re worth sharing here too.
 
As the name suggests you’re performing a set based on a length of time and not just a number of reps.
 
These are great for 3 reasons:
 
– Overload
– Mental Toughness
– Easy to Program
 
Here is an example of how you might utilise a timed set.
 
A1 – Squat x2min x4 sets
 
Pretty simple right?
 
Now you don’t need to have the time being a static thing, it can change set to set if required, this can allow for harder sets first or hard-easy sets.
 
A1 Squat –
Set 1 x120sec
Set 2 x90sec
Set 3 x60sec
Set 4 x30sec
 
Alternatively
 
A1 Squat –
Set 1 x30Sec
Set 2 x120sec
Set 3 x60sec
Set 4 x90sec
 
Honestly these are very enjoyable and also great for people who are short on time in their training because it will allow for accurate planning so that an effective session can be squeezed into very little spare time.
 
How long you decide to have the time of each set can be to your discretion, you might even choose to do 5min of non-stop squatting, tough yet 2 sets of that will be a good session for the day.
 
Here are two sessions I’ve personally alternated in the past when time has been tight, please be aware there was no specific warm up and I’d often use the first timed set as the warm up.
 
Session 1 – Kettlebells
A1 – Clean & Press x2min x3sets
B1 – Swings x5min x2sets
60 seconds rest
 
Session 2 –
A1 – Inverted Rows* x 2min x3sets
B1 – Squats** x5min x2set
60 seconds rest***
 
*Or renegade rows, or pull ups depending on gym kit
**Or kettlbell, barbell, sandbag, depending on gym kit
***Variable depending on what time I had, most session ended up being 20-25min only.
 
Very minimalistic, very effective.
 
If you’ve never tried timed sets before add them in as accessory work on smaller isolation lifts first because they catch a lot of people out because they’re easier on paper than they are in reality.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Rest is best

What is the shortest amount of rest you can take while still being able to maintain high effort outputs?

Knowing this will allow you to perform HIIT. 

It will also allow you to build up an acceptable level of metabolic fatigue for some added benefits to power endurance, however be aware that this won’t necessarily take your ability to produce power up, to do that you need to be fully revered and some. 

Having so many training options is both a blessing and a cruse. 

Due to the popular majority being focused around ‘feeling worked out’ or ‘tired’ it leaves too many people lacking any form of meaningful progress once they get past the point of beginner. 

Training is meant to make you stronger, not leave you smaller and more frail each time you push your limits, which is what happens to a lot of people.

There is one easy way around a session that tips you over the point of good stress (eustress) and into the realms of bad stress (distress).

Timing your rest periods. 

I know, something so simple it’s as if experts in the field of progress/performance have written about them for years. Oh, wait…

As a general rule these are what typical adaptation common rest periods are linked to:

<60 seconds = aerobic & muscular endurance 

120-180 seconds = anaerobic endurance/tolerance & muscular hypertrophy/strength 

180 seconds > = ATP-PC power/performance & muscular strength (absolute)

Now this is a very brief and wanting guide, to truly appreciate rest periods you’ll want to put income effort and start your reading journey with the glorious book: SuperTraining. 

Under recovering with short rest periods because you want to feel tired will indeed yield that result, however that’s all you’ll get from it because you’ll be unable to repeat productive efforts in your sets. 

While aiming to create ‘in-road’ and elicit and oxygen debt is indeed something viable, you must first understand the necessity for rest first and how manipulating rest periods works. 

Say you wanted to perform an anaerobic bias training set, what some call ‘metabolic training’, here is what it may look like on paper:

A1 – T-Sprint x 30-50m

A2 – Clean x4

A3 – Push Press x4

A4 – Sled Sprint x20m

A5 – Weighted Pull Up x4

There will be a 15-20 second average transition time between movements

Total rest between series is 4-7min 

2-3 total series

Most people will think they can use less rest because they’re special or unique, they are wrong. 

In the above example you’d want to rest the length of time that allows you to repeat a series with the same level of effort/output/performance, meaning the first rest might indeed be 4min, the second rest block might be 7min though.

The majority of people need more rest, not less.

Well, if they want to actually make decent progress anyway. 

The next time you train take a stop watch with you and stick with your rest periods that your coach (or whomever) has suggested. 

If it says 90seconds, that’s what you rest, so you start you next set bang on the 90 second mark, if you feel yourself slowing or in fact lose a rep on a set you’re done, unless otherwise advised by your coach to say drop 10% load of however they’ve set up your program.

Rest as little and as long as you need.

Enjoy,

Ross  

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Excuse me, your bias is showing

Fellow Trainers & coaches.

Your own experience will influence the way you train others. 

We touched on this yesterday, and this is by no means a bad thing however it’s easy to fall in to the trap of giving everyone what you like to program or feel comfortable programming. 

Again, while not necessarily a terrible thing, it is 100% a lazy thing.

Don’t get me wrong and think that this never happened my end because it did. 

Many times. 

While you can indeed find reasons for falling back on something that is quick and easy to spam out in a program, such as people asking for free advice, when you have paying clients it’s not the most optimal thing to be doing. 

Of course we will have various tools/protocols/programs stored in memory that we can draw on and guess what, they will work for a lot of people. 

This usually happens because these adhere to some basic and fundamental principles of training. 

If you take some time to look at the way people write programs you’ll notice a pattern in what they do. 

One of mine is the classic 3-week wave, often varying the lift itself at the end of each micro block, this is because it keeps people consistent because sadly most can’t stick with the same things for too long due to their addiction to social media and the constant need for novel stimulus and dopamine hits. 

While variety is a good and sometimes necessary thing, too much of it will not have you getting any form of decent result. 

How do we know this?

Look round at people who attend multiple classes or hope from program to program weekly, they may have some degree of fitness however it’s a far cry from where their current potential is. 

Now many will jump up an down championing “If it makes them happy leave them to it.” and these people are justified in saying that, however would you really be happy putting in what you feel is a tremendous amount of effort and not getting any real results?

Personally that is madness to me, why put in all that effort for no reward?

That’s like going to work and not getting paid.

You are by no means required to get results from your training/nutrition though, becoming strong, confident and have favourable body composition isn’t something you MUST do, yet if you’re going to put in the effort why not aim for that result?

The choice is yours on that one because that will come down to priorities.

You can train like a demon and do everything that will yield the above, yet you enjoy multiple alcoholic beverages each night so while you may build incredible fitness/strength you may still look like you don’t even train and hey, if you’re cool with that then fair play to you, fill your boots. 

I’ve digressed. 

Fellow coaches/trainers, do you program based on what is needed of simply what you know and can fall back on easily?

Training ideally wants to focus on these three things:

  • Keeping the goal the goal
  • Enhancing the participants life
  • Making that person better than they currently are (physically & mentally)

To do this we have many tools, these three principles will help you massively though:

  • Consistency 
  • Waviness of load 
  • Specialised Variety 

Feel free to look back on here and you’ll find plenty of programs I’ve thrown up over the years. 

You’ll see my biases creeping through, all geared towards strength for the most part and of late gaining maximum benefit with minimum effort, so a high ROI (tertian on investment).

Any questions please leave them below. 

Enjoy, 

Ross

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Dial in, and die.

Or is it dice now?

Once upon a time die was considered the singular term and dice was plural, however I think now it might just be dice for both singular and plural.

Anyway, this nifty little tool can provide some great training sessions.

All you need to is have one (you can use two, or you just roll one multiple times like a logical person would).

^^ Personally I quite like having two though as there’s nothing better than rolling two of them and getting a double 6.

If you are a person who needs structure yet finds it hard to stick to said structure then this will be a great tool for you.

Simply follow the below:

Set up 6 sessions for each of numbers on the dice.

Example:
1 – Clean & Push Press > Pull Up: Super Set
2 – Sprints (any kit)
3 – Deadlift > Kettlebell Swing >Farmers Walk> Floor Press: Giant-set
4 – Slams (any kit – think ropes, med balls, sand bags, etc)
5 – Squats
6 – Front Squat > Squat > Lunge: Ti-set

Next for the sets and reps, as an example.

On the lifting rolls form the above:
First roll (one dice) = reps you will do (1-6)
Second roll (two dice) = sets you will do (2-12)

That’s it, you may get a very easy day, or a very hard one, these don’t include warm ups though.

On the CV option from above:
First roll (one dice) = seconds of work (10-60 seconds)
Second roll (one dice) = seconds of rest (10-60 seconds)
Third roll (two dice) = total amount of rounds (2-12)

Personally I’d only preform one of the example sessions, even if it ended up being something like this:

Squats – 2 sets of 1 rep.

See it as a gift for a low volume session, the temptation would be to avoid doing more because when I’ve prescribed this in the past people have thought they’ve known better and make what would have been a very easy session stupidly hard by doing extra because of ego, then when the dice cast gave them a hard session they couldn’t perform.

Poor performance apparently happens to 1 in 5 you know.

Don’t give in to your ego, train once per day, if you have an easy session today, then train again tomorrow, if that is again super easy, train the day after that as well and keep repeating this until you get a session that takes a lot of effort and then you HAVE to rest for one or two days.

It’s a nice was to have some structure and yet still a good amount of variety because you don’t know what you will roll (unless the dice are weighted), so you could end upsetting the same session a couple of times in a row, unlikely however it might happen.

As you can see the above is super easy to plan/program.

My main advice for you would be this though; have 4 numbers with things you don’t do often and really need to be doing more of, and two that you like doing, this sill help your overall progress because we get better by doing the things we need to do (or don’t do), not what we want to do.

So go grab a die, or dice and have some fun.

Enjoy,
Ross

P.S – if you’re really sadistic you can use D&D dice.

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One move to almost rule them all

The clean & press (push press/jerk) is a great movement.

Whether you do it with a barbell, dumbbells, kettlebells, odd objects or people, it yields some great results.

As far as looking for a movement that covers everything, this is pretty damn close to being perfect.

I say close to because you can’t get maximal speed/power like you could with a snatch, nor the raw pressing strength like that of a bench press, or even the leg strength from a squat, you get the idea.

That being said, it’s still epic.

If you have any of these in your list of goals:

– Strength
– Increase LBM
– Lose Fat
– Increase Athleticism
– Look Cool

Then this is a movement you should be doing in abundance.

These days we have a lot of choice when it comes to training, and while this is great it’s also a problem because the level of results based on the average gym goer have gone down over the years.

Having too many options is the devil.

Back in an almost forgotten time when I would teach classes (well, small groups), the training would be simple, so much so that some used to complain and not come back.

I didn’t miss them, they didn’t have faith int he process and just wanted to have their bis appealed to and their ego stroked.

One thing with training is often the most effective stuff (once you’re past the point of beginner gains) is often a little dull and very repetitive.

To add in all the fancy and flamboyant stuff requires skill.

Not skill in coaching, although that is a necessity in my eyes, it requires skill from the participants in said training because if they can’t keep up then they need to take a step back and start at a level appropriate for them, less the don’t progress.

Anyone who’s worked with large groups will be able to give you lists of what works well and what requires some extra time/attention.

Anywho, back to the C&P.

Here is how you might apply this glorious movement to a three day per week training protocol.

This would yield Fat Loss as the primary function, LBM would be secondary and Strength as a by product.

All C/P variations done with a bar.

Day 1 –
W/U – Kettlebell Swing x15min (5/15 interval)
A1 – Clean & P/P x5-3-2-5-3-2-5-3-2
B1 – Front Squat x10-8-6-8-10
C/D – Stretching

Day 2 –
W/U – Bear Complex 3-5reps x15min (vary load as needed)
A1 – Clean & Press x1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
A2 – Bent Over Row or Pull Up x6-8
C/D – Stretching

Day 3 –
W/U – Loaded Carry (hug & shoulder, alternate) 20m x15min
A1 – Clean & Jerk x3-2-1-3-2-1-3-2-1-3-2-1-3-2-1
B1 – Floor Press x4-6×4-6
C/D – Stretching

Rest periods can be kept int he 60-120second mark after each wave, rest only long enough to change the weights int he way or briefly if you are going to keep the load static in a wave.

Example:

– 5 > add load, 3 > add load, 2 > add load > rest 120sec
– 5 > 20sec, 3 > 20 sec, 2 > 20sec > add load and rest 90sec

You get the idea.

This is one example, there are many more.

Enjoy,
Ross

P.S –

There are endless videos on how to do this, here is one decent one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcCGLoNqN2U

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An old joke with an important lesson

“How do you get to Carnegie Hall?”
 
A poignant question with an answer that few would dispute.
 
Practice.
 
The same is true for many things because in essence the only way to get better at something is to practice said something.
 
Now this doesn’t just mean random practice.
 
Oh no.
 
It’s deliberate practice that has focus, purpose and meaning, otherwise you’re just wasting time being busy.
 
I mean, by all means be busy and do with your time as you choose because it’s your time, however don’t expect anyone to care if you don’t end up going anywhere.
 
A lot of people waste time, especially these days, the waste time doing things which make them happy instead of things that make them better.
 
Before they know it they’re no longer happy because everyone and everything else has moved on and they’ve stayed the same.
 
Such a shame really, yet that was their choice.
 
Anyway.
 
Lately I’ve had the pleasure of discussing programming with various different people who are looking to learn more about this Alice like Wonderland of a topic.
 
One common theme being seen is the frustration from acc individual that they just can’t get it.
 
Now given how complex the topic can be their frustration is understandable, yet as with anything the only way they will get better is with practice.
 
That means writing program after program after program.
 
Using things such as classic block periodisation, undulating, non-linear, concurrent and more.
 
It’s all exposure that will help in their skill.
 
The hardest part is asking for feedback on their triumphs, because sadly feedback has a couple of positive and many areas from improvement.
 
Some take it to heart, which of course they shouldn’t, lacklustre programming doesn’t make them a bad person, it simply means they’ve still got more growing to do, and that is never a bad thing.
While it will sting to hear criticism, you take it on the chin because that’s just what you do if you want to get better.

(Remember this, if people take the time to give you such time/feedback it’s because they care.)

 
Much like a lot of things in this life, we can only grow through time and we can only get better over that time if we practice.
 
Not just any old practice though.
 
Deliberate practice that has focus, purpose and meaning.
 
You should investigate this thoroughly.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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3 forgotten steps for setting good goals.

Chances are you’re aware that setting your sights on the far horizon is a great way at keeping you focused on the path that lay before you.
 
We often find it’s once we’ve achieved the goal that things go wrong.
 
Once the praise has drive up and people are no longer falling over each other to congratulate you and grab a selfie, many begin to fade away.
 
Sadly the heights they’ve reached are now lost.
 
You see once you make a good change you are no longer in the place you were when you started aiming for that goal.
 
This is the biggest mistake you’ll see from people.
 
Achieving a goal, enjoying their time at the top, stagnating and slipping backwards due to a lack of attention/praise, then they attempt to repeat the previous steps and find they don’t quite work in the same way if at all.
 
You see our bodies are clever little organisms.
 
They remember previous stressors, they adapt to them and put in place mechanisms/systems to deal with that specific stress just incase it ever happens again.
 
You may have heard of this called the law of diminishing returns.
 
Put simply what once worked perfectly will often never work that well again.
 
Many people fall in to this trap and get frustrated.
 
“It worked before so why isn’t it working now? – I know, I will just do more of this and that will fix it.”
 
^^ Sometimes, for a short time this works, then you crash and burn.
 
Realistically this adaptive process our bodies have is something to be highly thankful of because without it we’d probably not be here.
 
As such if you want to keep getting praise, admiration and people flocking to you in their murder, then you need to keep your finger on the pulse of fitness.
 
“If you do what you’ll always done you’ll get less than you did before.” – Me 🤗
 
Don’t believe me?
 
Check out the people who try to out-train multiple glasses of wine and other alcoholic beverages by more work, they fail severely and each video/photo that goes up on the gram you can see they’re getting a little bigger each time.
 
Ah, survival and adaptation, we love you.
 
The big question then comes in to play; how do you avoid this?
 
That is where the three forgotten steps of goal setting come in to play.
 
1 – Reassessing your current level.
 
This is because you’ve got a new baseline now and what worked before may not work again, or if it does the results will be drastically lacking when compared to how you did previously.
 
Getting a new set of stats will help you logically plan the steps you NEED (objective truth) going forwards.
 
2 – Being objective in your estimations, not emotive.
 
Setting a positive emotion to your goal is all well and good, however people don’t move towards pleasure, they move away from pain.
 
Emotions can have to going back to the things you like or feel comfortable with, while it may give you the warm and fuzzy feeling you enjoy, this doesn’t mean it will get you to your goal, for that you need to be objective.
 
Example: Squats, Deadlifts & Sprinting will do more to build a solid pair of legs and bountiful booty than crab walks, cable abductor or kins backs ever will. This is an objective truth, not an emotive bias.
 
3 – Start of doing less than you think you should, just do it (less) better.
 
The trap of more ensnares a lot of people (myself included).
 
After a period of detraining you need to take a step back, perhaps starting off easier, lighter of with less volume than you FEEL (emotive response/bias) you need because you can’t progress if you don’t allow yourself to.
 
Hard to hear yet often necessary, well, if you want to make progress anyway.
 
🤗🤗🤗
 
There you have it, three elements of goal setting that people forget.
 
Here is a little something to get you started, it’s an ultra simple strength & conditioning routine.
 
Day 1 –
A1 – Press (any variation) 2×5-7
B1 – RDL 2×8-12
C1 – Sprint 8/22 x10min (8sec work, 22sec rest)
 
Day 2 –
A1 – Squat (any variation) 1×20
B1 – Supinated Row 2×6-8
C1 – Loaded Carry (any variation) x10min max distance
 
Day 3 –
A1 – Clean (full or power) 2×3-5
B1 – Dip 2×8-12
C1 – Rope Climb (no legs) x10min or Row 4-6×400-600m
 
The above are all working sets, they don’t take in to account warm ups leading to the main weight. So 2×5-7 means 2 GOOD sets of 5-7 with a close to all out effort (RPE 9).
 
Oh, one more thing, you’ll need to tidy up your nutrition.
 
The easiest way to strip of excess fat is with optimal nutrition, it’s far easier not to eat the 1000 calorie tub of ice cream than it is to burn it off.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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What most PT’s don’t want you to know

I’m going to let you in on a secret held closely by those in the fitness industry.

The majority of us have no real clue what we’re doing.

Honestly, in the early days apart from knowing a few basics on from (even that is questionable) when it comes to putting together training programs we’re woefully underprepared.

This is speaking from experience.

Initially what got given to people was nothing more than copies of what had been found in books or learned in passing by those more experienced.

This wasn’t really programming, it was merely getting people to exercise and expend energy.

Don’t get me wrong, for the larger population of gym-goers all they want is to feel like they’ve done something, they care little for the details or even if what they’re doing is optimal for them.

So long as they enjoy it that’s all they care about.

Do you know what, that’s 100% cool because if it keeps people training then it doesn’t really matter if their coach/trainer doesn’t really know what’s going on, so long as the client is happy that’s the priority.

It took me years to really get a good grasp on programming.

Even then there was still a lot of gaps.

Of course, over time a deeper understanding has been gained and now more can be seen in each successful program/protocol that is out there.

Has this improved my ability to coach/plan?

Yep, without a doubt.

Has it been something I will share with my clients?

Nope, most don’t want to know. They just want to be told what to do, how hard to work and that’s it.

Sadly the only people care about the quality and details in training programs are the coaches (and a few unique clients).

Thus you don’t have to be good at the above to do well in fitness, you just have to give the people what they want, a solid business tactic.

One word of warning though, the approach of giving people methods without understanding will only really work on beginners.

This is why you rarely see a PT/Coach in a gym wh works with anyone at the intermediate level or higher (they lack the depth of knowledge to do so), and do you know what, this is a good thing because it’s almost more hassle than it’s worth.

Being someone who has gone through various stages of learning and coaching I can tell you this much, no one really cares how much you know.

No one cares that a decent program can take several hours to write, in fact, most will be just as happy with something you cut & paste from the internet (cookie cutter stuff).

The only person that will ever know is you.

If you want to delve this deep then these three books are good places to start:

– Super Training by Mel C. Siff and Yuri Verkhoshansky
– Periodisation by Tudor Bompa
– The Transfer of Training in Sport by A.P. Bondarchuk

You can also find a lot of great info online for free.

Another gem of a book is Viking Warrior Conditioning by Kenneth Jay.

The choice is yours, my friends.

Enjoy,
Ross

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Lingering Logical Loopholes

The experiences, expectations and biases we gain over a lifetime lead us to some rather interesting beliefs.
 
We end up thinking, feeling that things should always go a certain way and when there is a slight difference we end up potentially rejecting this new happening/process.
 
Now, this is not to say that what happens is wrong or bad, it’s just different.
 
Different doesn’t mean pain-free or without discomfort.
 
After all, learning or accepting how to learn that there are more than a select few ways of getting a result is not always easy, yet it’s often worth it.
 
The above thought came from a small epiphany I had.
 
If you’ve followed these ramblings over the years you’ll have noticed the programming element has undergone some drastic growth and a couple of days ago a large piece of the puzzle finally got put in the correct place.
 
Upon writing down various numbers, in-fact letting it all flow out and just ‘happen’ is the best way to describe it.
 
What was in front of me made sense, and so did all of the other documents, books and programs I’d read over the years. At last, I didn’t just see the pattern, I understood it.
 
I will tell you something funny though.
 
Even in knowing what was now on the paper right in front of me and the reasons why it would work, in the back of my mind this thought cropped up: “It looks too easy.”.
 
Coming from a background that held the attitude and belief that ‘hard work trumps all’ and ‘do more, do better’, it was apparent this still held some sway, even knowing better.
 
These days I personally try to follow the tome of “Do less better than more worse.”.
 
Still, that thought of something looking too easy still cropped up.
 
Funny, right?
 
Letting go of outdated beliefs is one of the hardest things we can do, and it will take time yet be 100% worth it in the end.
 
What old notions (if any) do you find pop up, even if you know better?
 
Leave your thoughts below.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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