Tag Archives: pain

No pain, no problem… right?

Just because you’re not in pain that doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem.
 
Being the intelligent bunch you are I’m sure you understand that pain (more often than not) is the end result of the wheels falling off something.
 
Sadly many wait until this point.
 
If you are to take a look at your overall structure, movement, muscular balance and performance you’ll probably see gaps and potential for an issue of two to arise.
 
This is where pre-hab is important.
 
The whole mantra of ‘prevention is better than cure’ is 100% on point in this context.
 
I personally have three main considerations you may enjoy taking on board.
 
1 – Do you have full/minimum-optimal ROM in every joint?
2 – Is your strength balanced on both left/right sides?
3 – How is your balance?
 
^^ Of course if you compete in a high level of sport then you may have some rather large asymmetries, that is the cost of the sport and eventually your bill will be due, however so long as you’re willing to pay it, then it’s all good.
 
In the context, we’re looking at those three points it refers to the average person who won’t ever win gold at the Worlds or the Olympics.
 
Now, as mentioned above you may be pain-free.
 
This is a good thing, it means your body is either nice and equal or it’s compensating well.
 
The above tests will highlight the following:
 
1 – That you can get into the right positions without compensation and if you can’t it can lead you to understand why eg, injury, muscle imbalance, stiff fascia, etc.
 
2 – Are you producing the same (within reason) levels of force each limb, or do you need to address an imbalance before you get RSI from the strong side picking up the slack of the weaker side.
 
3 – The feet can give you great insight in to where structural issues are coming from, if your balance is off the body will twist, torque, stiffen (in places it shouldn’t be stiff/loosen in places it shouldn’t be loose)and shift as required to stop you from falling over face first, this isn’t a good thing because as you get older it gets worse, so you may wish to look in to it.
 
Consider the above a Health MOT.
 
Giving yourself a check over once a month or so will do you the world of good.
 
Say you do find an issue or two, then you can add mobility work, muscle/fascial release or unilateral work in to address what needs addressing.
 
If this knowledge of what to do is beyond you then hire a professional, there is no shame in asking for help.
 
Give the above some thought.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Pain isn’t always progress.

“No pain, no gain!”
 
“If you’re sore you know you did something.”
 
“The more you hurt, the more you progress.”
 
“You have to break the muscle down so it can build back up stronger.”
 
All things I’ve heard several times over the years, however just because you’re sore or you have DOMS it doesn’t mean you’re making progress.
 
*DOMS = Delayed onset muscle soreness
 
Let me use a logical fallacy to elaborate on my point.
 
If you lift weights and hurt the next day then this means you’ll make progress, so by that logic all people who are in major car accidents should be jacked because they’re really sore after one.
 
Seems a tad silly when put like that doesn’t it.
 
Of course that is pure fallacy, the two situations are not comparable, however the logic of pain = progress is.
 
As a beginner we may feel some discomfort or DOMS, this forces us to perhaps what 2-3 days before training again to recover.
 
^^ There is a key point in that.
 
TO RECOVER.
 
It’s not the soreness that made us progress, it’s the recovery element and adaptation that occurred.
 
You can cause enough muscular inroad/oxygen debt to make your body change without necessarily feeling like you’ve been hit by a train, however people don’t think like that.
 
People think that unless they are destroyed then the session was wasted, this is a flawed logic.
People chase fatigue rather than performance – bad move.
 
If you were making progress (getting stronger, bigger, leaner etc) on a training protocol would you stop it just because you didn’t ‘feel’ like you were doing anything?
 
Sadly the answer for many is yes because people are idiots.
 
Yep, I’ve know plenty that have been making epic progress, then stopped that style of training because they didn’t feel like they were working hard enough, which lead them to doing something similar to what they had done before.
 
This of course left them feel destroyed and like they’d worked hard, yet they made no progress.
 
I suppose that doesn’t matter so long was you ‘feel’ like you did something, right?
 
Crazy logic.
 
Progress is progress, even if you don’t leave a season hardly able to walk.
 
If you want to feel sore go and do 1000 reps of a single moment in a workout, you’ll be epically sore, however you won’t progress the way you think.
 
Why?
 
Well MPS (muscle protein synthesis) lasts 24-48 hours and if you are too sore you can’t train frequently enough to keep it elevated to actually create a need for you body to adapt and overcome and surpass it’s limits, you merely end up surviving workouts.
 
Think about that.
 
Now this is not to say that you won’t have session where you don’t feel like that, of course you will, they’re usually the first 2-3 the you start a new block of training, then your body adapts to that initial surprise and the DOMS/discomfort disappears.
 
Once this happens you need to buckle down and begin the grind for progress.
 
Don’t chase fatigue, chase performance.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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