Tag Archives: intermediate

Making the Jump

Results are easy and almost always guaranteed when your’e working with beginners.
 
Literally everything works due to their level of noobness.
 
As a PT/Coach if you don’t get a beginner to a goal then you might need to reevaluate your career choice.
 
The struggle comes from those who’ve perhaps been in the gym for a while and have achieved results once or perhaps a few times before they take up your services.
 
These are the one that need you to delve in to the realms of fitness far deeper.
 
Personally I split it in to 4 pieces.
 
1 – Their Why
2 – End Goal
3 – The Emotional Need
4 – Willingness to Sacrifice
 
Let us break them down.
 
1 – Their Why
 
Helping someone is easy, however helping someone reveal or understand why they want to do X,Y or Z is an entirely different matter.
 
Having a cast iron ‘why’ will keep people moving forwards because each time something crops up you can ask them if they remember why they’re doing what they’re doing (as in why they’re working towards the goal).
 
2 – End Goal
 
You’d do well to look at this in a big picture sense.
 
We might even say it’s the perfect outcome they they desire that links unquestionably with their why.
 
Once you know the big picture you can start to pick out the smaller pieces of it to help set the small milestones as this will allow those quick wins and little hits of emotional sustenance and validation that is sought.
 
A goal is more or a leaking tap dripping single water droplets every hour to fill a bath tub than it is using a hoe to fill a paddling pool.
 
3 – The Emotional Need
 
We do what we do because we want to feel a certain way.
 
Emotion drives many people, it is linked with their reason why they do what they do. The need is to fill a hole that they consider almost as important as air to breathe.
 
If the need isn’t being met then other methods will be sought to fill this void like emotional eating or some other such debauchery.
 
Knowing what/how/why people currently feel and more importantly why they want that to change and what it will mean to them is the key element many miss.
 
4 – Willingness to Sacrifice
 
There can be no change without change, and their can be no real change without sacrifice.
 
Such might be going out 2 nights a week on the lash instead of 5, or forgoing the tub of ice cream each night before bed and so on.
 
The only problem is that people get very emotionally attached to their habits and to sacrifice them causes quite a nasty feeling (usually loss).
 
When working with beginners they’re ready to give things up because they see it as only short term, then they revert back to their old ways and expect the results to stay; this is not how change works.
 
This is where working with those who’ve repeated this cycle become difficult as they’ve gotten trapped in no longer wanting to sacrifice anything while still desiring change.
 
We can relate this back to why they want said change, and if it is more or less important to their habit/thing that needs to be sacrificed.
 
You’ll often find there is an emotional attachment/need to the sacrifice in question which then leads us to asking which is more important, the thing or the end goal.
 
Some will say “Why can’t they have both?” and put simply it is because they just can’t due to conflict.
 
As the old saying goes, you can’t make an omelet with out breaking any eggs.
 
Same goes for achieving a goal, somethings got to give.
 
This is how you can start to take those troubled clients forwards.
 
Understand it’s less about the training at this stage (although that is of course important) and more about the mindset required.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Forget Front Delts.

If you are to stop in almost any gym and take a look around you will find lots of people with impressively large Front Delts.

These play one part in creating boulder shoulders but you will find men spend a lot of time focusing on the needlessly, often because of a video they saw on Pumping Iron of Arnold doing a full overhead dumbbell front raise. So with their logic they assume they should do it too, when in reality they have no need.

Why the advice to not train a body part?

Your front delts get enough stimulus from doing bench press, overhead press, incline press, basically any pressing movement you’re doing will get in a sizeable amount of front delt, so will fly’s for that matter.

It’s recommended that the average person will have weak read delts and practically no shape laterally, they neglect the 2 heads of the delt that will give the shoulders the impressive loo they desire.

If you’re one of these guilty people fear not, this simple yet effective 3 day protocol will help you add that much sought after shape & size to your shoulders.

Day 1 –

A1 – Lateral Raise 5×15
A2 – Reverse Fly (pronated grip) 5×15
B1 – Iron Cross Hold 5x fail (note time)

Day 2 –

A1 – Y-Press x8
A2 – Face Pull x16
A3 – Lateral Raise x24
*You may swap the face pull and lateral raise around if you wish.
Do 3-5 sets of this tri-set with no rest until your last lateral raise.

Day 3 –

A1 – Reverse Fly (pronated grip) 4×12
A2 – Face Pull 4×12
B1 – Reverse Fly (supinated grip) 4×12
B2 – Cable Upright Row 4×12
C1 – Snatch Grip Behind Neck Press 4xfail

These can be added to your workouts and shouldn’t take you longer than 20min tops to get done.

Enjoy
Ross

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