Tag Archives: daily practice

Nice Snatch

The kettlebell snatch is one of my favourite movements.
 
While there are many subtle tweaks you can apply in your form they all stem from two styles of snatch with a kettlebell:
 
1 – Hard Style
2 – Sport Style
 
The first is meant to generate more ‘power’ and make you stronger overall while still getting a good solid amount of volume in and increasing your work capacity.
 
The second is all about efficiency of movement so that you can get the most reps in a given time period (typically 10min in the snatch section of the Biathlon, only one hand change is allowed).
 
You might want to know which is better.
 
The classic answer is this; it depends on the goal.
 
While this is indeed the case it’s a cop out answer for people who don’t want to state a preference. Over the years I’ve done both many times and these days I lean towards doing the sport variation more.
 
Why you ask?
 
Because it feels more comfortable with the sport bells.
 
When I grab my cast iron ones I will often opt for the hard style snatch as the handles and dimensions are more forgiving for it.
 
Here are the two in action side by side:
 
 
Notice how the sport style on the left emphasises fluidity and pacing which the hard style is more about oomph.
 
Both are good, both have pros & cons, you simply have to decide which is better for you and your goal.
 
Snatching works well in many ways.
 
– Ladders: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 both arms
– Time Blocks 5-20min
– Intervals 30/30-60rest
– Straight Sets 10×20 per arm
– Pacing per min: 60 seconds for 15 reps L/R x10min
 
The options are endless.
Snatches work best when largely focused on density in training.
 
One things both can agree is that there will be a great benefit to your shoulder health, strength, conditioning, body composition and overall athleticism when this glorious movement is added to your training.
 
Hitting some snatch work 2-3 times per week will truly be a massive benefit.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
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A bit of a tangent

***This post isn’t for body builders***
 
– The take away message is right at the bottom to save you time
 
Now the trigger warning is out of the way, let’s continue.
 
You like training, right?
 
Like most, and I’m guessing like you, I certainly do.
 
In fact training every day is something that makes me vary happy.
 
There is only one issue with this though, rigidity.
 
Have you ever heard of Greasing the Groove?
 
The brainchild of Russian lineage, and popularised by Pavel Tsatsouline, it involves picking a one or a handful of movements and practicing them daily.
 
You will rarely, if ever train to a state of fatigue.
 
In fact you should always be fresh at the end of every set, feeling stronger and that you could have done more is the ideal state to be in.
 
The issue for many with this is that they are so used to ‘working out’ they feel the need to leave a session even if its only 5min feeling destroyed, which is just not really a good mentality to have.
 
I get it though, I really do.
 
On a personal level, like you, I too want to feel like I’ve done something, that I’ve put in some effort and made progress, however just because we’ve killed ourselves that doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do.
 
Now there are times to push the envelope, just not all the time.
 
You can of course push it hard all the time if you choose, however there will be a price to pay.
 
You’re heart rate each session is 90%+……
 
You get no praise from me because that is worrying, in training you want to be floating around 50-70% of HRR for the most part, if you always end up with it higher then there could be an underlying issue with your body (nervous system, hormone levels etc).
 
Essentially somethings not right.
 
We like to chase the feeling, the rush.
 
It’s addictive, however the big question is this; why?
 
Why do you need it?
 
^^ A very long corridor to go down which we will save for another time, back to GTG.
 
Training daily and the potential rigidity that comes with it.
 
It can happen because we get attached to our habits, or rather the movements we are doing, for several reason.
 
– We get good at them
– We enjoy them
– We have now formed a habit
 
While in all honesty most people could literally forge a strong functional body with these 5 movements done daily (an no others for the rest of their life), it would perhaps get a tad dull in the end.
 
Daily Practice of Awesome
 
– Kettlebell Swing (1 or 2 handed) 75-250 reps total
– TGU 5-10 reps total
– Pull Ups (any variation) 5-10 reps total
– Push Up (any variation) 5-10 reps total
– Single Leg Squat (any variation) 5-10 reps total
– Ab Roll Out (or core variation) 5-10 reps
 
*There is nothing magic about the reps, they’re just sustainable.
 
That’s it, maybe 5min of mobility that involves crawling or climbing as well would be golden.
 
To be fair Swings, Crawling and Climbing (rope, wall, etc) would be life changing for most people.
 
Climbing a 10-20m rope once a day every day would give you so much more than spending 3 days in the gym ‘working out back’ from a health, longevity & functional stand point.
 
Where was I going with this…..
 
Oh yea, training daily.
 
Our bodies are meant to move and receive a stimulus on daily basis.
 
You don’t have to follow GTG – doing the same movement(s) each day for multiple sets of 2-3 reps throughout the day, however it’s a great way to get strong, add some lean mass and stay mobile.
 
You can do GTG by doing one different movement everyday, say Swings on Monday, Hand Balancing on Tuesday, Pistol Squats on Wednesday and so on.
 
This style, this philosophy of training is something you do for life.
 
You can do as many or as few movements as you choose, just try to pick ones that will keep you young (moving well), this means that while you can do bench press every day it may cost you shoulder health in the future, or it may not, I don’t know.
 
You’ve got any amazing opportunity you know.
 
That body of yours can do many great things, sow hy not capitalise on it 🤗
 
Anyway, that’s enough rambling from me today.
 
Take away message:
 
– Move daily
– Pick a few moves to do each day or….
– Pick one move to do periodically throughout the day
– Reps 2-3 per set or less than 50% of your max reps
– Always finish feeling stronger than when you started
– Have fun with it
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Saitama was on to something

Once upon a time I squatted everyday for a year.
 
Each day I would warm up with multiple sets of low reps and finish on a heavy-ish single with crisp form and good speed, the type of squat varied each day, some days there would be some back of sets (2-3) & reps (2-5).
 
This little gem helped me hit a 3xBW squat.
 
The effectiveness of training daily, or rather daily practice of a movement was indeed something incredibly valuable, yet the hard part was not doing too much, even though it was done everyday.
 
On days that felt strong I might have gone a tad heavier, and on the weaker ones there was simply an easier squat variation used that was less stressful.
 
When people hear this, this question that often follows:
 
“Is it good to train every day, won’t you overtrain?”
 
I get asked things like this a lot and it is fair.
 
My answer is always this:
 
“It’s fine to practice everyday.”
 
Our bodies are meant to do daily activities, however that isn’t training, or at least not the training many consider worth their time.
 
Too many people are fatigue seeking.
 
In doing this they destroy their potential for progress.
 
Over the years we made the mistake of listening to those who claim amore was better, harder was better, unless you’re sore for 27days straight post one training session you didn’t do it right.
 
Utter twaddle-speak.
 
All this is doing is playing up to a mental bias, if you think about this logically for a second you will see the fault in it.
 
Let us look at these two days for example, which do you feel will yield more progress:
 
*Calories are set accordingly, sleep is at 6-8 hours per night.
 
Option A – You train 365 days out of the year (yes, you get some Christmas Day gains too), waving the volume/load each session allowing for heavy/light days (peak/recovery) and the majority of your training if satisfyingly tough (medium days).
 
Option B – You 150 days out of the year because each session you go as hard as you can and require a few days to recover due to being sore/fatigued. Every session you give it your all, you never let up, not even once and go as heavy as you can each session (fatigue defining just how hard that is).
 
Of the two options which do you think will yield more benefit?
 
While both will provide you with progress, one allows you to auto-regulate and flow with the go, the other is power by conventional wisdom and ego meaning you need to do all you can.
 
From experience I can tell you that the overall results in regards to strength, hypertrophy and aesthetics are actually not altho different, honestly it ends up being pretty damn close.
 
So what is the difference?
 
Again from experience I will tell you this, the first option I was never sore, my form go incredibly sharp on all of my lifts due to the consistent practice and life wasn’t affected. The second option was great for saving time however being sore for days and then sometimes to being recovered enough to train properly again made it a grind and not that enjoyable.
 
In essence what I am saying is this; it doesn’t matter what you do so long at you do it with intent.
 
Personally I prefer the daily practice element because it is aimed at being a life long thing.
 
You will also find you can gain more total volume over time and maintain your progress with more ease than if you take the ‘go hard or go home approach’.
 
Which option is more appealing to you and why?
 
Have a think and leave your answer below.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Goal – Skill – Daily Practice

A great question to ask yourself –
 
“How much do I want this?”
 
You can insert your own goal/desire.
 
Morning All,
 
Goals in fitness these days tend to be a tad arbitrary in nature, as in they are just goals of rate sake of having a goal.
 
They tend to serve no higher purpose.
 
This is why having a sport/hobby to help you focus is often good idea because you can tailor your training to your interest so that you improve performance.
 
Once you have done this you’ll find the following useful.
 
Step 1 – Set the goal
Step 2 – Ascertain what skills you need to achieve the goal
Step 3 – Understand what daily practices will help you learn the skills you require.
 
Example:
 
1 – Drop X amount of fat (goal)
2 – Learn satiety control, or eat until satisfied not stuffed (skill)
3 – Eat slower (daily practice)
 
Take some time and plan accordingly.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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