Tag Archives: books

Too good not to share

I came across this article while browsing through the inter webs for knowledge and it’s too good not to share.

https://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-get-ripped-with-4-rep-sets?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=article4844

Christian Thibaudeau is one of my favourite and his knowledge is phenomenal, you’ll enjoy this read.

I will certainly be giving this a go as I am currently short on time in my own training.

Ross

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Butt Hurt to Commence in, 3…2…1…

Monday, Monday
So good to me
Monday morning
It was all I hoped it would be…
 
That means gym 7-8am, 2 meals already eaten, 2 articles written and a back tweak, yay for me :/.
 
Morning Guys,
 
I trust you all had a productive weekend, if you didn’t, well… shame on you.
 
There is a lot of protection for peoples ego/pride in the modern age and it seems to be having a negative effect because it is making people lazy, more lazy than they have ever been.
 
Obviously there are those who are the other end of the spectrum and are anything but, however those are not the majority, sadly.
 
What ever happened to tough love?
 
You know, people would see you fail in a catastrophic manor, give you a pat on the back with a few words of wisdom and then tell you to crack on and stop wallowing in the mud.
 
These days that approach would be considered insensitive, inconsiderate to peoples feeling, belittling, demotivating and not supportive of people. I’m all for helping people but wrapping them in cotton wool? Nope, not my style, it does nothing for building character or more importantly, resilience.
 
Now that’s a word from the past, resilience.
 
What happened to it?
 
It seems to have been forgotten in the channels of time along with – that’s life, get over it, better luck next time, toughen up and “perhaps you should try knitting”.
 
All joking aside, the kid gloves of the modern world are actually a very dangerous thing, they hold people back and give false expectations or rather, they give people a sense of entitlement and that is a very slippery slope, let me give you an example oh how this relates to fitness.
 
Person A – Works hard, does everything they should be doing to get their desired results, accepts set backs and take on board constructive critique on the chin for what it is (advice to help them grow) to allow progression. The they achieve results because they understand they have to work for them and that nothing ever comes easy. They earn their success. 
 
Person B – Works semi moderate to not really doing anything meaningful, does some of what they should do, feels life is against them and no one ever helps them, rejects critique because it hurts their feelings, stays in the comfort zone but feels they should get the same results as person A because they just should. Sadly results will happen initially then taper off fast, potential regress too and this is obviously not their fault at all… They feel entitled to success (this is not good). 
 
Now these are actually real examples of people, they haven’t been made up I am sorry to say.
 
Many of you know that nothing in life comes easy and chances are for the majority it never will, that’s just life. While I agree we need to be mindful of people and encourage them there also has to be a line where we say “Stop pissing about, the problem is you.” which we seem to be afraid to say nowadays.
 
Maybe it’s my attitude… It’s definitely my attitude, it doesn’t have time to waste on people who feel entitled, yep, that makes me an asshole but hey ho, we can either work hard or not, it’s that easy.
 
Which camp do you fall in to, honestly…
 
Work hard and you will achieve what you deserve in the end, accept life isn’t all sunshine and rainbows, become resilient and earn your success, don’t expect it all to be given to you on a plate, you’re not entitled to success, work for it, earn it, deserve it.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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Almost the same, but not quite.

This week I made my way through a several books, some on philosophy and others training related. Two in particular were the Science & Development of Muscle Hypertrophy, and The Muscle & Strength Training Pyramid, both had good information that covered the same topic from two different view points, with the most interesting part being that they both covered similar studies but their recommendations for achieving optimal hypertrophy were not identical in every aspect.
 
The M&S Pyramid had the following to day:
– Frequency: train each muscle group 2-3xP/W.
– Total volume: 40-70reps per muscle group P/S (80-210P/W).
– Intensity: 1-15RM – 3/4 total volume in 6+ rep range & 1/4 in 1-6 rep range, RPE based.
– Exercise Recommendation: 1-2 compound and 1-3 isolation per muscle group.
– Rest: 90-180seconds rest (90-isolation, 180-compound)
– Tempo: Nothing too fancy, stay controlled and safe but make sure that the tempo doesn’t become too slow that it compromises the weights being lifted and lowers the overall intensity.
 
Some pretty solid recommendations based on a nice blend of science and experience.
 
Here is what the S&D of Muscle Hypertrophy have to say:
 
– Frequency: train each muscle group 2-3xP/W.
– Total volume: 40-70reps P/S (no mention of weekly volume but far more in protein synthesis elevation and how it correlates to growth).
– Intensity: 1-20+ reps with the load determining the rep range, 6RM-12RM most mentioned while also hitting momentary muscle failure.
– Exercise Recommendation: Had a section on muscle actions/mechanics with some examples but nothing specific, basically compound with isolation mixed in.
– Rest: 90-120seconds rest (90-isolation, 120-compound)
– Tempo: 30second minimum TUT per set.
 
All in all pretty similar, all be it with a couple of differences in terms of overall recommendations. This is why it’s worth gathering information from various sources so that you can compare and make your own informed decisions about what you know.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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