A post for average people and fitness professionals alike.

Writing programs is pretty simple really.
 
The only issue is that this doesn’t mean it’s easy.
 
Like many things you’ll need a lot of practice to become good at it.
 
Often when you look at a new trainer/coaches program you can see one of three things:
 
1 – It’s a copy paste job from online
2 – Too much going on & it’s influenced by social media
3 – Sadly it doesn’t make sense
 
Now while we all have to start somewhere when it comes to writing programs many don’t know where that point actually is.
 
As such we go base don what we know or what we have done ourselves, not a bad shout if you actually have made decent progress in the field of fitness yourself.
 
These days we have access to endless information.
 
It is both a gift and a curse.
 
When it comes to picking out diamonds from amongst the rough I have three go to books I will steer people towards that cut out a lot of the bullshit.
 
– Easy Strength by Dan John & Pavel Tsatsouline
– Dinosaur Strength Training by Brooks Kubik
– Periodisation by Vladimir B Issurin
 
The first gives you some great info on training people like actual people.
 
The second gives you tried and tested workout/program/session structures that you can plug in and play with immediately.
 
The third starts to take you down the deeper route of understanding why/how things work and are put together.
 
You see as a trainer/coach it is important for you to have adequate knowledge in the field of program/session construction and yet it’s not something many really give any real time to investigate.
 
Instead they jump on social media to follow the trends of recommendations of what the highest rated influencer has to say, and most of that is absolute dog shit, series it’s terrible and you’d do well not to listen at all.
 
Those of us who came from a time where we didn’t have access to the internet learned through experience and asking people who were int he profession for advice/help.
 
We understood the importance of investing in our education.
 
Not expecting to be told do XYZ, rather why we may choose to do XYZ and then form there how to explore movement, programming for GPP/SPP or what other avenues might be available to use.
 
These days the respect for A&P has gone out of the window.
 
This means that instead of understanding how they body works, why it moves in specific directions and how that can influence training for a desired outcome, many just want to be given a list of exercises to follow that can become their gospel tome.
 
It’s quite sad really.
 
If you ever wonder why the standard of trainer has gone down this is the reason why – trainers have gotten lazy.
 
Not all trainers mind you, just a large majority of them.
 
So keeping this in mind, how would you pick a trainer?
 
Here are some questions to ask:
 
– What was the last course you went on?
 
The best trainers are always continuously investing in their education.
 
– How many clients do you currently have?
 
Experienced coaches know that more isn;t better and won’t try to sound busy by bumping up numbers to elicit the scarcity principle. Plus if someone has 40 clients how will they have time to invest a good amount of their focus in you?
 
– Do you have a coach/mentor yourself?
 
Most who’ve been in the game a while understand that they themselves need help as well. If a trainer can’t reinvest in their own health that is a warning sign.
 
Finally the last question:
 
– What will you do if I don’t get results?
 
Obviously people will try and say things along the lines of “You will, I won’t let you fail” etc. However someone who knows their own limitations will be honest, and say that you both will need to communicate well from day one and actually assess if you’re both the best fit for each other.
 
If after the initial assessment it turns out you’re not well suited then they will refer you on to someone else.
 
Give the above some thought.
 
Enjoy,
Ross

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