The most common deadlift flaw.

The deadlift is a great test of strength, you simply grab something and lift it off the floor. If that isn’t a the best indicator of someones ability to generate raw force then who knows what is.
 
When it comes to this lift there are a great many faults that occur, however the most common is not the rounded back, although that is a very close second.
 
The most common flaw is not pulling the slack out of the bar.
 
Addressing the bar with a correct set up is something everyone can learn easily, the same is true for keeping a fairly neutral spine, however pulling the slack out of the bar take some time to master because it removes any extra momentum and this is what people usually use to break the weight off the floor.
 
If you use a jerky momentum to get the weight off the floor you will fin that you lose position, end up with no leg drive and make the lift quite difficult.
 
The reason people use momentum is due to the fact that they feel the bar won’t break the floor unless they do, which is wrong and also dangerous until you’ve got 100% solid form. The bar won’t break the floor if you fail to generate the necessary amount of force to do so, taking the slack out gives you the best chance of achieving this. Even if it does feel like it won’t move to begin with.
 
How do you pull the slack out then?
 
Once you’ve set up and taken hold of the bar, start by gripping it tight and locking in your lats, then start to lift your chest and pull the bar up, if you do this correctly you will feel the bar flex slightly, meaning you’ve pull out the slack. You should hear a small ‘chink’ if you’ve done it correctly.
 
 
Keep the slack out by staying tense and pulling against it, then use your legs and push the floor away.
 
Spend some time mastering this technique and you will find your deadlift numbers increase and you injury rates go down.
 
Enjoy,
Ross
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